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  1. COVID-19 Experiences Among South African Adolescent Girls and Their Mothers
    Source: University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health
    Date Published: 6/18/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: This tool was developed to measure experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic among South African adolescent girls (ages 15-19 years) and their mothers/caregivers within the IMARA (Informed, Motivated, Aware and Responsible Adolescents and Adults) study. It addresses psychological experiences (e.g., stress) and coping strategies, as well as effects of COVID-19 on mother-daughter relationships, living situations, sexual risk behaviors (e.g., frequency of sexual intercourse, drug/alcohol use), and health practices (e.g., adherence to medication). It is designed to be completed via self-report, either in person or over the telephone.

    Questions Adapted From: -Q1 is from the COVID-19 Exposure and Family Impact Survey (CEFIS), developed by The Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress
    -Qs 2-12 are adapted from the COVID-19 Questionnaire Child Self-Report Primary Version, Environmental Influences on Child Health
    Population: Adults and Teens
    Length: 23 questions
    Time to Complete: 7-8 minutes
    Mode of Administration: Online (e.g., computer-assisted interview)
    Telephone
    Administered by: Trained Lay Examiner/Interviewer
    Language(s): English; Xhosa

    COVID-19 Experiences among South African Adolescent Girls and their Mothers: Full Questionnaire https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UIC_COVID19Experiences_SouthAfricanAdolescentGirlsAndMothers.pdf
    Mental Health: General Mental Health https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UIC_COVID19_Experiences_Mental.pdf
    Personal and Family Impacts: Family Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UIC_COVID19_Experiences_Impact.pdf
    Risk-Reduction Behaviors: Substance Use; Sexual Behavior; Housing Security https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UIC_COVID19_Experiences_Risks.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Word version: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/dr2/COVID19Experiences_SouthAfricanAdolescentGirlsAndMothers_15June2020.docx

    Available Formats: PDF

    Contact Information: Dr. Geri Donenberg
    Center for Dissemination and Implementation Science
    University of Illinois at Chicago
    Email: gerid@uic.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22689. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  2. Global COVID-19 Clinical Platform: Case Report Form for Suspected Cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS) in Children and Adolescents Temporally Related to COVID-19
    Source: World Health Organization (WHO)
    Date Published: 6/1/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: This eight-page form, updated on June 1, 2020, is to be completed for all children aged 0–19 suspected to have multisystem inflammatory disorder temporally related to COVID-19 (even if all criteria in the case definition are not met – to capture full spectrum of the condition).

    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 15 items
    Mode: Pen and Paper
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language: English
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Direct link to document: https://apps.who.int/iris/rest/bitstreams/1279054/retrieve
    ID: 22232. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  3. COVID-19 and Telemental Health Service Use Survey: Telemental Health Service Use
    Source: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC)
    Date Published: 6/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The COVID-19 and Telemental Health Service Use Survey was developed to help researchers and clinicians better understand how COVID-19 has affected the mental health of respondents, and their telemental health service use. Telemental health services include the use of voice call, video call, text messaging, mobile app, web-based formats (e.g., website, email), internet support group, or chat room to receive mental health treatment or counseling. The Institutional Review Board of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provided the study a notification of exemption from further review (IRB Study #20-1588).

    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 26 items
    Time to Complete: 8 minutes
    Mode of Administration: Online (e.g., computer-assisted interview)
    Administered by: Self Administered
    Language(s): English

    COVID-19 and Telemental Health Service Use Survey: Full Questionnaire https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UNC_CTHSUS.pdf
    Tele mental health services Use: Mental Health Treatment; Telehealth https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UNC_CTHSUS_Use.pdf
    Tele mental health services Satisfaction: Telehealth; Mental Health Treatment Feedback https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UNC_CTHSUS_Satisfaction.pdf
    Tele mental health services Concerns: Telehealth; Mental Health Communications https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UNC_CTHSUS_Concern.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Available Formats: PDF

    Contact Information: Terika McCall, PhD, MPH, MBA
    Carolina Health Informatics Program
    100 Manning Hall
    Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3360
    tmccall@unc.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22688. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  4. Coping with COVID Through Nature: Evidence from Breast Cancer Patients
    Source: Michigan State University (MSU)
    Date Published: 5/18/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: In order to increase physical activity and reduce chronic stress on a population level, researchers and city planners are exploring features of the built environment, including access to urban green space that may promote healthy lifestyles. Parks serve as places to engage in physical activity (PA) in direct contact with nature -- called "green exercise" -- which has been shown to lower perceived stress and risk of chronic disease. In addition, research indicates that passive exposure to green space (e.g., visual, as in the sight of plants and trees, and auditory, as in birdsong) may lower stress. However, many adults may experience barriers to getting outdoors, visiting parks, and engaging in PA during COVID-19 lockdowns, particularly people with compromised immune systems like those living with cancer. Exploring both how and why physical activity and outdoor behaviors have changed can help us to further understand the decision-making process and potential interventions that will benefit the health and well-being of breast cancer patients.

    Questions Adapted From: Questions about usage of outdoor spaces were both novel and adapted from University of Minnesota and Kansas State University surveys on outdoor activities during COVID-19. Perceived stress scale from Cohen (Cohen, S., T. Kamarck, and R. Mermelstein, A global measure of perceived stress. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1983. 24: p. 385-396). Quality of life questions from PROMIS (Hays, R.D., et al., Development of physical and mental health summary scores from the patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) global items. Quality of life research: an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation, 2009. 18(7): p. 873-880). Symptom experience from Cleeland (Cleeland, C.S., Symptom burden: multiple symptoms and their impact as patient-reported outcomes. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr, 2007(37): p. 16-21).

    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 150 questions, including health and demographic questions
    Time to Complete: 20 minutes
    Mode of Administration: Online (e.g., computer-assisted interview)
    Administered by: Self Administered
    Language(s): English

    Coping with COVID through nature: Evidence from breast cancer patients and the output from the intake form: Full Questionnaire https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/MSU_CWC.pdf
    Community Impacts: Physical Activity; Community Access https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/MSU_CWC_Community.pdf
    Environmental Factors: Nature Appreciation https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/MSU_CWC_Enrvironmental.pdf
    Mental Health: General Mental Health https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/MSU_CWC_Mental_Health.pdf
    Cancer Impact: Non-COVID-19 Symptoms and Medicines https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/MSU_CWC_Cancer.pdf
    Personal Demographics: Personal Demographics; Health Care https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/MSU_CWC_Demographics.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Licensing required for the MDAIS questions only. All other questions freely available.

    Available Formats: PDF

    Contact Information: Amber Pearson
    Michigan State University
    apearson@msu.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22691. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  5. Psychological Stress Associated with the COVID-19 Crisis
    Source: Stanford University
    Date Published: 5/14/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: Unique questions and the standardized Perceived Stress Scale are used to assess psychological stress due to remote work during the COVID-19 crisis. The purpose is to measure the level of stress during this time and characterize it according to location, gender, income, and other factors. It includes confidential survey questions about homeschooling, dependent care, full-time remote work, and social distancing.

    Population: Adults only
    Length: 37 questions
    Time to Complete: 8-10 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered
    Language(s): English, Spanish French, Italian, Japanese, Chinese

    Psychological Stress During COVID-19 Crisis: Full Questionnaire https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/Stanford_COVID19.pdf
    COVID-19 related Lifestyle Change: Daily Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/Stanford_COVID19_Lifestyle.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Available Formats: PDF
    Free/Publicly Available
    Programmed online survey link: https://www.abslab.stanford.edu/

    Contact information: Maheen Mausoof Adamson: madamson@stanford.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22198. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. Coronavirus Anxiety Scale
    Source: Christopher Newport University (CNU)
    Date Published: 5/14/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: Basic information
    The coronavirus anxiety scale (CAS) is a self-report mental health screener of dysfunctional anxiety associated with the coronavirus crisis. Because a significant number of people experience clinically significant fear and anxiety during
    an infectious disease outbreak, the CAS was developed to help clinicians and researchers efficiently identify cases of individuals functionally impaired by coronavirus-related anxiety.

    Psychometric properties
    Independent studies of adults residing across the United State have demonstrated that the CAS is a reliable instrument (αs > .90), with solid factorial (single-factor; invariant across sociodemographics) and construct (correlated with anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation, and drug/alcohol coping) validity. The diagnostic properties of the CAS (90% sensitivity and 85% specificity) are comparable to related screening instruments, such as the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7.

    Scoring and interpretation
    Each item of the CAS is rated on a 5-point scale, from 0 (not at all) to 4 (nearly every day), based on experiences over the past two weeks. This scaling format is consistent with the DSM-5’s cross-cutting symptom measure. A CAS total score ≥ 9 indicates probable dysfunctional coronavirus-related anxiety. Elevated scores on a particular item or a high total scale score (≥ 9) may indicate problematic symptoms for the individual that might warrant further assessment and/or treatment. Clinical judgement should guide the interpretation of the CAS results.

    Length: 5 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Languages: English, Brazilian Portuguese, Hebrew, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Turkish, Urdu
    Special Considerations: COVID-19

    Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS): Mental Health https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/Coronavirus_Anxiety_Scale_CAS.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Lee, S. A. (2020). Coronavirus Anxiety Scale: A brief mental health screener for COVID-19 related anxiety. Death Studies. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07481187.2020.1748481

    Contact Information:
    Dr. Sherman Lee: sherman.lee@cnu.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22203. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  7. Obsession with COVID-19-Scale
    Source: Christopher Newport University (CNU)
    Date Published: 5/14/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: Basic information
    The Obsession with COVID-19 Scale (OCS) is a self-report mental health screener of persistent and disturbed thinking about COVID-19. Because the COVID-19 crisis affects nearly every aspect of a person’s life, the OCS was developed to
    help clinicians and researchers efficiently identify cases of individuals functionally impaired by their COVID-19 related thinking patterns.

    Psychometric properties
    The OCS was developed on two large samples of adults (n = 775; n = 398) residing across the United States. The OCS is a reliable instrument (αs > .83), with solid factorial (single-factor) and construct (correlated with coronavirus anxiety, spiritual crisis, alcohol/drug coping, extreme hopelessness, and suicidal ideation) validity. The diagnostic properties of the OCS (81% to 93% sensitivity and 73% to 76% specificity) are comparable to related screening instruments, such as the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ).

    Scoring and interpretation
    Each item of the OCS is rated on a 5-point scale, from 0 (not at all) to 4 (nearly every day), based on experiences over the past two weeks. This scaling format is consistent with the DSM-5’s cross-cutting symptom measure. An OCS total score ≥ 7 indicates probable dysfunctional thinking about COVID-19. Elevated scores on a particular item or a high total scale score (≥ 7) may indicate problematic symptoms for the individual that might warrant further assessment and/or treatment. Clinical judgement should guide the interpretation of the OCS results.

    Length: 4 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Languages: English, Hebrew, Korean, Polish, Romanian, Turkish, Urdu

    Obsession with COVID-19 Scale (OCS): Mental Health https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/CNU_OCS_Obsession.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Citation: Lee, S. A. (2020). How much "Thinking" about COVID-19 is clinically dysfunctional? Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159120306826?via%3Dihub

    Contact Information:
    Dr. Sherman Lee: sherman.lee@cnu.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22204. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  8. Telling Our Stories in the Age of COVID-19
    Source: Cornell University
    Date Published: 5/6/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: Overarching Goal: This study is intended to better understand the day-to-day impact of the novel coronavirus on the lives of the global public. Using regular journal entries along with several open- and close-ended questions specific to the impact of COVID-19, we aim to understand personal experiences of the global pandemic as it occurs in real time. We are specifically interested in situational changes, COVID-19 exposure and experience, COVID-19-related concerns, daily mood changes, and perceived impact, mental health impact, and use of social media.

    Study Population: As of May 6, 2020, participants represent 29 countries and 35 states within the United States. At the current time, respondent age range is 18-82 (mean = 44.8) and largely female (89.29%; 9.2% male). There is considerable variation in where people are living (this was check all that apply): 38% are with a spouse/partner, 18% with children <18, 10.2% with adult children, 10.7% with parents, 4.9% with roommates, and the rest in variations on this basic arrangement. Neither socioeconomic status (SES) nor race/ethnicity data was collected.

    Study Design: All participants have been recruited using principal investigator networks, organizational partner (Cornell University and Jed Foundation) publicity, and paid advertisements on Facebook in a number of regions around the world and within the United States. Participants enter the study through an online portal (https://www.covid-stories.com/) and are sent an initial survey where living context data are gathered. After signing up, participants receive a daily link to a short survey that assesses change since previous participation in a right of domains. Twice a week, respondents are sent a slightly modified version of the daily survey to assess mental health impact and social media use.

    Population: Adults only
    Length: 34 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English

    Telling our stories in the age of COVID-19 (TOSC): Full Questionnaire https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/Telling_our_stories_in_the_age_of_COVID-19.pdf
    COVID-19 Situational and Contextual Factors: Employment; Demographics https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/CU_TOSC_Situational.pdf
    COVID-19 Regional Restriction Status: Government Response https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/CU_TOSC_Restrictions.pdf
    COVID-19 Concerns About Health, Finances, and Overall Impact: Health Care; Economic Insecurity https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/CU_TOSC_Concerns.pdf
    COVID-19 Health Status: Status; Diagnosis https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/CU_TOSC_Health_Status.docx.pdf
    COVID-19 Impact: Overall Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/CU_TOSC_Impact.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Available Formats: PDF
    Free/Publicly Available

    NOTE: The document at the provided URL includes specific survey domains and measures that are a compendium of all items used across the three surveys (the initial survey, the daily survey, and the twice-a-week survey). Non-COVID-19 specific measures appear at the bottom of the measure list.

    Link to Study Website: https://www.covid-stories.com/

    Contact information: Janis Whitlock, MPH, PhD, Cornell University: Jlw43@cornell.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22127. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  9. ABCD COVID-19 Impact Measure
    Source: University of California, San Diego (UCSD)
    Date Published: 5/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The COVID-19 Impact Measure was created to be administered to the participants of the NIH-sponsored Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) longitudinal study of 11,880 diverse community youth enrolled at age 9-10 in 2016-2018 (i.e., birth years 2006-2009) at 21 research sites around the United States. The ABCD sample (63% White, 20% Latinx, 16% Black, 12% more than one race, 2% Asian, <1% American Indian, <1% Pacific Islander; half female) was targeted to match U.S. demographics as defined by the American Community Survey and is being followed until at least age 20. ABCD will send all currently enrolled participants (age range: 11-13) and their parent/guardian the opportunity to complete the ABCD COVID-19 questionnaires. The questionnaires will be administered once a month for four months. Each participant and their parent/guardian will be emailed a unique secure link to the parent and child forms to complete the survey in REDCap. Compensation will be provided upon receipt of the completed form. These measures were developed by a workgroup consisting of ABCD investigators with expertise in adolescent development, mental health, sleep, physical activity, substance use, and disaster response, and the electronic surveys underwent preliminary testing via expert review and pilot testing with adults and children.

    Note the Parent Measures contain the English and Spanish wording. The Parent Measure appears in two parts to accommodate parents who have more than one child in the ABCD Study (our design intentionally oversampled identical twins): Part 1 consists of questions that pertain to parent and family factors; Part 2 consists of questions pertaining to each child they have in the study. ABCD's COVID-19 research sends the measure multiple times over several months in 2020; to reduce participant burden, some items have skip-out branching logic and other items are given at one or two survey administrations and other items are administered each time (noted in comments in the measure PDFs).

    Domains included in the measure:
    * Family Situation: Home composition, economic impact, illness, parent support
    * Youth's Schooling: quality, quantity, methods, and supervision
    * Youth's Routine and Sleep
    * Relationships: friends and family
    * COVID Attitudes and Adherence (to public health directives)
    * Mental Health and Stress: depression, anxiety, worry, post-traumatic stress
    * Substance Use: alcohol, vaping of nicotine and cannabis, other intoxicants
    * Screen Use: for school, socializing, other reasons
    * Media Exposure to COVID-19
    * Physical Health: activity, food access, COVID-19 symptoms

    Population: Adults Only
    Children/Teens Only
    Length: ~85-90 items (Youth)* ; ~80-90 items (Parent) *Note: both measures have skip-out branching logic and not all questions may be asked to all participants.
    Time to Complete: 10-15 minutes
    Mode of Administration: Online (e.g., computer-assisted interview)
    Administered by: Self Administered
    Language(s): English, Spanish (Parent)

    ABCD COVID-19 Impact Measure - Parent Questionnaire https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent.pdf
    Family Situation: Economic Insecurity; Avoidant Behaviors https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Family.pdf
    Youth's Schooling: Education https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Schooling.pdf
    Youth's Routine and Sleep: Physical Activity; Sleep Changes https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Routine.pdf
    Relationships: Family Impact; Hygiene; Social Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Relationships.pdf
    COVID Attitudes & Adherence: Conflict; Attitudes https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Attitudes.pdf
    Mental Health & Stress: Mental Health; Stress https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Mental_Health.pdf
    Substance Use: Substance Use https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Substance_Use.pdf
    Screen Use: Media Use https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Screen_Use.pdf
    Media Exposure to COVID-19: Sources of information about COVID-19 https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Media_Exposure.pdf
    Physical Health: Symptoms; Diagnosis; Health Care https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Parent_Physical_Health.pdf

    ABCD COVID-19 Impact Measure - Youth Questionnaire https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth.pdf
    School Schedule: Education https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_School.pdf
    Youth's Routine and Sleep: Sleep Changes https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Routine_and_Sleep.pdf
    Parents/Guardians: Home Life https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Guardians.pdf
    Relationships: Family Impact; Social Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Relationships.pdf
    Mental Health & Stress: Mental Health https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Mental_Health_Stress.pdf
    Substance Use: Substance Use https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Substance_Use.pdf
    Media Exposure to COVID-19: Sources of information about COVID-19 https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Media.pdf
    Screen Use: Media Use https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Screen_Use.pdf
    Physical Health: Physical Activity https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UCSD_ABCD_Youth_Physical_Health.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available Youth Survey: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/dr2/ABCD_COVID-19_Impact_Measure-Youth.pdf
    Available Formats: PDF
    Contact Information:
    Susan Tapert, PhD.
    abcd-covid@ucsd.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22354. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  10. Coping with COVID-19: Impact on technology use, mobility, food security, depression and social isolation
    Source: University of Florida (UF)
    Date Published: 5/2020
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The purpose of this study is to remotely survey older adults about their behaviors, social activities, food security, depression, technology use, and mobility patterns prior to and after the COVID-19 outbreak. We will also ask about practicing COVID-19 precautions during outbreak. This survey knowledge will be critical for targeting educational, policy and behavioral interventions designed to regain and/or modify older adults life activities post-COVID-19. Potential participants will either enter or click on the weblink to access the survey. The front page will contain the following information: broad purpose, optional nature of the survey, amount of time the survey takes, HIPAA compliances, risks, privacy, and research staff contact information in case of questions. The survey is approximately 200 questions depending on responses and skip patterns. It takes about 30-45 minutes to complete. The surveys are broken into logical domains and are ordered in the manner to capture the most important information first. Questions under each module listed below represent elements of validated surveys from PROMIS and others in the literature. Some have been modified to capture changes since the COVID-19 outbreak. The bottom of each module contains a “submit” button at which time the data are saved.

    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 200 questions
    Time to Complete: 30-45 minutes
    Mode of Administration: Online (e.g., computer-assisted interview)
    Special considerations for Administration: must be taken online at https://redcap.ctsi.ufl.edu/redcap/surveys/index.php?s=Y8LL3DFYCK
    Administered by: Self Administered
    Language(s): English

    Coping with COVID-19: Impact on technology use, mobility, food security, depression and social isolation https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/Coping.with.COVID19.pdf
    Mobility Due To COVID: Physical Activity https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Mobility.pdf
    Technology Telehealth Use During COVID: Media Use; Telehealth https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Technology.pdf
    Life-space Mobility During COVID: Mental Health https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Life_Space.pdf
    Mood and Sleep During COVID: Mental Health; Sleep Changes https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Mood.pdf
    Socialization During COVID: Social Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Socialization.pdf
    Physical Activity During COVID: Physical Activity; Daily Life https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Physical.pdf
    Other Activities During COVID: Overall Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Other.pdf
    Food Access During COVID19: Food Security https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Food.pdf
    Thoughts and Feelings About COVID-19 (open ended): Overall Impact https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/toolkit_content/PDF/UFl_Coping_with_COVID19_Thoughts.pdf
    ...[more] [less]
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Available Formats: PDF

    Contact Information:
    Todd M. Manini, Ph.D., FACSM FGSA
    tmanini@ufl.edu
    Associate Professor
    Dept. of Aging and Geriatric Research
    Institute on Aging
    University of Florida College of Medicine

    Questions adapted from: Some questions are adapted from PROMIS measures.

    Survey: https://redcap.ctsi.ufl.edu/redcap/surveys/index.php?s=Y8LL3DFYCK
    Includes Research Tools: Yes.
    ID: 22355. From: Disaster Lit®a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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