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Displaying records 1 - 13 of 13

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  1. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Alert: Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease from Exposures Caused by Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and Other Nonindustrial Buildings
    Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
    Format: PDF (1.3 MB)
    Date Published: 11/2012
    Annotation: This 28-page document describes the respiratory problems that occupants may experience from exposures in damp buildings, presents summary information on outbreaks of building-related respiratory disease, and provides recommendations on how to identify, respond to, and prevent building dampness and related respiratory symptoms and disease. [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems; Environmental Exposure(s)
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Direct link to document: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2013-102/pdfs/2013-102.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: No
    ID: 11378. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  2. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Alert: Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease from Exposures Caused by Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and Other Nonindustrial Buildings: Appendix A: Building Inspection Checklist
    Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 11/2012
    Annotation: Research studies show that exposures to building dampness and mold are associated with respiratory symptoms such as asthma, hypersensitivity, and other health impacts. These subsequent illnesses occur in part from a lack of knowledge and understanding of the nature and severity resulting from dampness and mold in buildings. This checklist, located in Appendix A, pages 19-21, describes methods for identifying evidence of leaks or dampness that can be addressed before extensive damage occurs. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.


    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: n/a
    Population: Adults only
    Length: 34 questions
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Environmental Exposure(s)
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation:

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Indoor Air Quality: Tools for Schools: Action Kit. Washington, DC; Reston, VA; Chicago, IL; New York, N.Y. 1995. No subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Phone: 800-CDC-INFO
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11428. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  3. PILOT Study: Dampness and Mold Assessment Tool Instructions Packet
    Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2011
    Annotation: This observational assessment tool was developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to gauge signs of dampness, water damage, mold growth, and musty odors in rooms and areas throughout a building. The information collected aims to provide valuable data for motivating remediation, prioritizing intervention, and evaluating remediation effectiveness. This packet describes step-by-step instructions to identify and record areas of dampness or mold, trigger early repair, create awareness of potential problem areas, and track or monitor past and present areas of focus. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 3.6
    Population: Residential/Workplace, All/Anyone
    Length:
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Environmental Exposure(s)
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citations:
    Park JH, Schleiff PL, Attfield MD, Cox Ganser JM, Kreiss K. Building-related respiratory symptoms can be predicted with semi-quantitative indices of exposure to dampness and mold. Indoor Air. 2004; 14:425 - 433. PubMed PMID: 15500636. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15500636. Subscription required.

    Cox-Ganser JM, Rao CY, Park JH, Schumpert JC, Kreiss K. Asthma and respiratory symptoms in hospital workers related to dampness and biological contaminants. Indoor Air. 2009; 19(4):280-290. PubMed PMID: 19500175. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19500175. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Michelle Martin
    Institution: NIOSH
    Phone: 304-285-5734

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Email: moldsheet#1@cdc.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11427. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  4. European Community Respiratory Health Survey
    Source: European Union, European Commission
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) contains questions about breathing and respiratory problems. ECRHS is based on a multi-center, international study initially set up in the early 1990s to assess the prevalence of asthma and allergies in young to middle-aged adults. It was the first study to assess the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in young adults in many countries using a standardized protocol. There are three phases, with approximately 200,000 participants in the questionnaire phase 1, and 26,000 in the clinical phase 2; phase 3 is currently in progress. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: ECRHS Appendix B 1 Main Questionnaire I = Grade 3.7
    ECRHS II = Grade 6.7
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: Phase I main questionnaire: 71 questions; this does not include sub-questions.
    Phase II main questionnaire: 92 questions; this does not include sub-questions.
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Swedish, Vietnamese, Dutch, French, Japanese, Polish, Hindi (partial), Marathi (partial), Chinese, Norwegian, and Korean
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Moline JM, Herbert R, Levin S, Stein D, Luft BJ, Udasin IG, Landrigan PJ. WTC medical monitoring and treatment program: comprehensive health care response in aftermath of disaster. Mt Sinai J Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;75(2):67-75. PubMed PMID: 18500708. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18500708. Subscription required.

    Burney PG, Luczynska C, Chinn S, Jarvis D. The European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Eur Respir J. 1994 May;7(5):954-60. PubMed PMID: 8050554. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8050554. Subscription not required.

    Janson C, Anto J, Burney P, Chinn S, de Marco R, Heinrich J, Jarvis D, Kuenzli N, Leynaert B, Luczynska C, Neukirch F, Svanes C, Sunyer J, Wjst M; European Community Respiratory Health Survey II. The European Community Respiratory Health Survey: what are the main results so far? European Community Respiratory Health Survey II. Eur Respir J. 2001 Sep;18(3):598-611. PubMed PMID: 11589359. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11589359. Subscription not required.

    Norbäck D, Zock JP, Plana E, Heinrich J, Svanes C, Sunyer J, Kí¼nzli N, Villani S, Olivieri M, Soon A, Jarvis D. Lung function decline in relation to mould and dampness in the home: the longitudinal European Community Respiratory Health Survey ECRHS II. Thorax. 2011 May;66(5):396-401. doi: 10.1136/thx.2010.146613. Epub 2011 Feb 16. PubMed PMID: 21325663. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21325663. Subscription not required.

    Le Moual N, Carsin AE, Siroux V, Radon K, Norback D, Toren K, Olivieri M, Urrutia I, Cazzoletti L, Jacquemin B, Benke G, Kromhout H, Mirabelli MC, Mehta AJ, Schlí¼nssen V, Sigsgaard T, Blanc PD, Kogevinas M, Antó JM, Zock JP. Occupational exposures and uncontrolled adult-onset asthma in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II. Eur Respir J. 2014 Feb;43(2):374-86. doi: 10.1183/09031936.00034913. Epub 2013 Aug 15. PubMed PMID: 23949964. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23949964. Subscription required.

    Researchers who make use of any of the materials from this study in papers or protocols are requested to appropriately cite the source.

    Contact information:

    Contact person(s): Professor Peter Burney, Professor Debbie Jarvis, Mrs. Sabrina Kapur, Department of Respiratory Epidemiology and Public Health
    Institution: Imperial College London, National Heart and Lung Institute
    Address: South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ
    Phone: +44 (0)20 7589 5111

    For more information:
    Institution: European Community Respiratory Health Survey
    Web: http://www.ecrhs.org/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8623. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  5. St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ)
    Source: St. George's, University of London (SGUL)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) is a disease-specific instrument designed to measure impact on overall health, daily life, and perceived well-being in patients with obstructive airway disease. Part 1 of the instrument looks at symptom components (frequency and severity) with a one-, three-, or 12-month recall (best performance with three- and 12-month recall); Part 2 examines activities that cause or are limited by breathlessness and impact components (social functioning, psychological disturbances resulting from airways disease) which refer to the current state as the recall period. It has been noted that this tool has good discriminative and evaluative properties and is responsive to therapeutic trials. It was developed and validated in both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although it has been validated for use in bronchiectasis and has been applied to patients with sarcoidosis. The SGRQ is best thought of as a research or audit tool. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.5
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 50 Questions
    Time to Complete: 8-15 Minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Afrikaans, Filipino, Gujarati, Bengali, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, Greek, Hungarian, Icelandic, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Serbian, Slovakian, Slovenian, Ukrainian, French, Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Malay, Thai, Vietnamese, Hebrew, Turkish, Bulgarian, Croatian, Estonian, Arabic, Spanish, German, Dutch, Czech, Danish, Russian, Farsi, Finnish, Latvian, Italian, Indonesian, and Swedish

    To download and review this list of translations: http://www.healthstatus.sgul.ac.uk/SGRQ_download/List%20of%20SGRQ%20languages.pdf
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Banauch GI, Izbicki G, Chistodoulou V, Weiden MD, Webber MP, Cohen H, Gustave J, Chavko R, Aldrich TK, Kelly KJ, Prezant DJ. Trial of prophylactic inhaled steroids to prevent or reduce pulmonary function decline, pulmonary symptoms, and airway hyperreactivity in firefighters at the world trade center site. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2008 Mar;2(1):33-9. PubMed PMID: 18388656. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18388656. Subscription required.

    Jones PW, Quirk FH, Baveystock CM. The St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Respir Med. 1991 Sep;85 Suppl B:25-31; discussion 33-7. PubMed PMID: 1759018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1759018. Subscription required.

    Jones PW, Quirk FH, Baveystock CM, Littlejohns P. A self-complete measure of health status for chronic airflow limitation. The St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Jun;145(6):1321-7. PubMed PMID: 1595997. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1595997. Subscription required.

    Barr JT, Schumacher GE, Freeman S, LeMoine M, Bakst AW, Jones PW. American translation, modification, and validation of the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Clin Ther. 2000 Sep;22(9):1121-45. PubMed PMID: 11048909. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11048909. Subscription required.

    The St. George's University of London Medical School grants permission for clinicians to use the SGRQ without charge. The Medical School charges commercial organizations a license fee for use of the SGRQ. For additional details on how to obtain a license to use the SGRQ or for an electronic copy of the Excel-based scoring calculator, please email Yvonne Forde, sgrq@sgul.ac.uk.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dr. Paul W. Jones, PhD, FRCP, Professor of Respiratory Medicine
    Institution: St. George's University of London, Division of Clinical Science
    Address: Jenner Wing, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 ORE, UK
    Phone: +44 (0) 20 8725 5371
    Fax: +44 (0) 20 8725 5955
    Email: pjones@sgul.ac.uk
    Web: http://www.healthstatus.sgul.ac.uk/

    For more information:
    Institution: American Thoracic Society
    Web: http://www.thoracic.org/assemblies/srn/questionaires/sgrq.php
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8628. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. British Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire
    Source: Medical Research Council (MRC)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The British Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire was developed by researchers at the Medical Research Council (MRC) in the United Kingdom as a tool to study respiratory epidemiology in communities and occupational groups. It reliably relates symptoms and lung function and has been in use for almost 50 years. The questionnaire was designed for the diagnosis of chronic bronchitis in epidemiological studies, and therefore contains few questions relating to the diagnosis of asthma. Due to the limited questions concerning asthma, studies using this questionnaire supplement the questions with ones on severity, frequency, and recentness of episodes, treatment, and age at onset. This tool examines respiratory symptoms such as cough, phlegm, breathlessness, wheezing, and chest illnesses, now and during the past two years, and contains detailed questions on smoking history and a checklist on past illnesses. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    This measure can be located in the appendices as Attachment D of this document: Tennant S, Szuster F. Nationwide monitoring and surveillance question development: Asthma. Working Paper Series No. 2. Public Health Information Development Unit, Adelaide. 2003.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: Older versions contain approximately 17 questions; 1986 version contains 22 questions.
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes:
    Download document as adapted for the NIH Disaster Research Response Program:

    Tennant S, Szuster F. Nationwide monitoring and surveillance question development: Asthma. Attachment D: The British Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire. Working Paper Series No. 2. Public Health Information Development Unit, Adelaide. 2003
    PDF

    Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Comstock GW, Tockman MS, Helsing KJ, Hennesy KM. Standardized respiratory questionnaires: comparison of the old with the new. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Jan;119(1):45-53. PubMed PMID: 420437.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/420437. Subscription required.

    Torén K, Brisman J, Järvholm B. Asthma and asthma-like symptoms in adults assessed by questionnaires. A literature review. Chest. 1993 Aug;104(2):600-8. Review. PubMed PMID: 7802735. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7802735. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: J. E. Cotes
    Institution: Medical Research Council, UK
    Email: MRCQ@coterie.globalnet.co.uk; corporate@headoffice.mrc.ac.uk.
    Phone: 01793 416200
    Web: https://www.mrc.ac.uk/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8632. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  7. American Thoracic Society and National Heart and Lung Institute-Division of Lung Disease Respiratory Questionnaire (ATS-DLD-78-A)
    Source: American Thoracic Society (ATS)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute developed a respiratory questionnaire, the ATS-DLD-78-A, which is based on the British Medical Research Council (MRC) Respiratory Questionnaire. The aim of this instrument is to examine cough, phlegm, wheezing, breathlessness, illness, and various risk factors. There are two components to this tool: (1) a series of questions that are considered to be the bare minimum that should be asked; it is highly recommended that they be included in any implementation of the questionnaire; and (2) another set of questions that are considered to be optional/modular in nature and given at the discretion of individual investigators. Extensive testing has been done with regard to this instrument, which has been recommended for use in epidemiological studies. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    This resource can be located in the appendices as Attachment E of this document: Tennant S, Szuster F. Nationwide monitoring and surveillance question development: Asthma. Working Paper Series No. 2. Public Health Information Development Unit, University of Adelaide. 2003.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 2.9
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 46 Questions-Child version (under 13 years of age)
    29 Questions-Adult version (age 13+)
    19 Questions-Supplemental/Additional (based on population and area of interest)
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Japanese
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes:
    Download document as adapted for the NIH Disaster Research Response Program:

    Tennant S, Szuster F. Nationwide monitoring and surveillance question development: Asthma. Attachment E: American Thoracic Society and National Heart and Lung Institute-Division of Lung Disease Respiratory Questionnaire. Working Paper Series No. 2. Public Health Information Development Unit, University of Adelaide. 2003.
    PDF

    Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Comstock GW, Tockman MS, Helsing KJ, Hennesy KM. Standardized respiratory questionnaires: comparison of the old with the new. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Jan;119(1):45-53. PubMed PMID: 420437. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/420437. Subscription required.

    Toren K, Brisman J, Järvholm B. Asthma and asthma-like symptoms in adults assessed by questionnaires. A literature review. Chest. 1993 Aug;104(2):600-8. Review. PubMed PMID: 7802735. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7802735. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
    Address: Two Rockledge Center, Suite 10042, 6701 Rockledge Drive MSC 7952, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7952
    Web: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/org/dld/

    Institution: American Thoracic Society
    Address: 25 Broadway, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10004
    Phone: 212-315-8600/212-315-8684
    Fax: 212-315-6498
    E-mail: atsinfo@thoracic.org
    Web: http://www.thoracic.org/about/index.php

    To preview this tool:
    http://www.thoracic.org/statements/resources/archive/rrdquacer.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8629. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  8. Questionnaire of the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECSC) on Respiratory Symptoms
    Source: European Union, European Commission
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The European Community for Coal and Steel (ECSC) questionnaire was a translation of the British Medical Research Council questionnaire, with additional questions regarding asthma and occupational history included. The questionnaire is located in the appendices on pages 168-177 at the end of the following article: http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/2/2/165.full.pdf. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 4.3
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 43 questions; this does not include subsets of questions.
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Danish, Greek, Portuguese, and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Minette A. Questionnaire of the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECSC) on respiratory symptoms. 1987--updating of the 1962 and 1967 questionnaires for studying chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Eur Respir J. 1989 Feb;2(2):165-77. PubMed PMID: 2703044. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2703044. Subscription required.

    Pride NB. Revision of the European Community for Coal and Steel Questionnaire on Respiratory Symptoms. Eur Respir J. 1989 Sep;2(8):697-9. PubMed PMID: 2680580. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2680580. Subscription required.

    Authors involved with the development and availability of this tool ask that any reproduction of it properly cite the source and/or origin of the material.

    Contact information:

    Institution: European Commission
    Email: address-information@ec.europa.eu
    Web: http://ec.europa.eu/contact/index_en.htm

    For more information:
    Institution: EU (European Union) Bookshop
    Web: http://bookshop.europa.eu/lv/notes-on-the-ecsc-questionnaire-for-studying-chronic-bronchitis-and-pulmonary-emphysema-pbXK0576001/downloads/XK-05-76-001-EN-C/XK0576001ENC_001.pdf;pgid=y8dIS7GUWMdSR0EAlMEUUsWb00006Gf6-3Y4;sid=zEno93QxjiPo_SdnT7x2UBYUboqUpzlS0js=?FileName=XK0576001ENC_001.pdf&SKU=XK0576001ENC_PDF&CatalogueNumber=XK-05-76-001-EN-C.
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8633. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  9. Tucson Epidemiological Study of Obstructive Lung Diseases
    Source: University of Arizona
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Tucson Epidemiological Study of Airway Obstructive Disease is a population-based prospective cohort study initiated in 1972 in Tucson, Arizona. At study initiation, 3,805 Tucson residents between the ages of six to 95 years participated; participation in the study ultimately increased to 5,377 people. The purpose of the study and related instruments was to determine the natural history, etiology, and interrelationships of emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, and related airways obstructive diseases, and to determine the relationship of acute lower respiratory tract illnesses in infants and children to the development of subsequent chronic lung disorders. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 4.5
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 194 pages, four sections/modules at different stages of follow-up
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Lebowitz MD, Burrows B. Tucson epidemiologic study of obstructive lung diseases. II: Effects of in-migration factors on the prevalence of obstructive lung diseases. Am J Epidemiol. 1975 Aug;102(2):153-63. PubMed PMID: 1155444. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1155444. Subscription required.

    Lebowitz MD, Knudson RJ, Burrows B. Tucson epidemiologic study of obstructive lung diseases. I: Methodology and prevalence of disease. Am J Epidemiol. 1975 Aug;102(2):137-52. PubMed PMID: 1155443. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1155443. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact Person: Michael D. Lebowitz, PhD, FCCP, FACE, FCR, Professor, Medicine and Public Health; Director and Chairman, Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Director, Arizona Prevention Center; Member, BIO5 Institute
    Institution: University of Arizona, Department of Medicine
    Address: AHSC 4410B, P.O. Box 245163, Tucson, AZ 85724-5163
    Phone: 520-626-7090, 520-626-6379, 520-318-7270
    Email: mlebowit@u.arizona.edu

    Institution: University of Arizona, Clinical Research Unit, Arizona Respiratory Center
    Address: 1501 N. Campbell Avenue, P.O. Box 245030, Tucson, AZ 85724
    Phone: 520-626-9543
    Email: lungresearch@email.arizona.edu
    Web: http://lungresearch.arizona.edu/study/tucson-epidemiological-study-airway-obstuctive-disease This link is no longer available. 8/10/2015.
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8634. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  10. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) Respirator Medical Evaluation Questionnaire: Mandatory
    Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Respirator Medical Evaluation Questionnaire specifies the minimum requirements for medical evaluation that employers must implement to determine an employee's ability to use a respirator. The questionnaire applies to OSHA standard 1910.134 Appendix C. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Population: First Responders, EMS Personnel, Police/Fire Departments
    Length: 46 questions, three sections; this does not include subsets of questions.
    Time to Complete: Not specified/given
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Languages: English and Spanish
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    Data Collection on: Occupational Health
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Rink GS. OSHA's new respiratory protection standard. Applicability to the worksite. AAOHN J. 1998 Dec;46(12):569-73. PubMed PMID: 10025249. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10025249. Subscription required.

    Szeinuk J, Beckett WS, Clark N, Hailoo WL. Medical evaluation for respirator use. Am J Ind Med. 2000 Jan;37(1):142-57. Review. PubMed PMID: 10573602. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10573602. Subscription not required.

    Lee SA, Adhikari A, Grinshpun SA, McKay R, Shukla R, Zeigler HL, Reponen T. Respiratory protection provided by N95 filtering facepiece respirators against airborne dust and microorganisms in agricultural farms. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2005 Nov;2(11):577-85. PubMed PMID: 16234218. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16234218. Subscription required.

    Syamlal G, Doney B, Bang KM, Greskevitch M, Groce D, Ganocy S, Hoffman W. Medical fitness evaluation for respirator users: results of a national survey of private sector employers. J Occup Environ Med. 2007 Jun;49(6):691-9. PubMed PMID: 17563613. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17563613. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    Address: 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210
    Phone: 800-321-OSHA (6742)/ TTY: 877-889-5627
    Web: http://www.osha.gov; https://www.osha.gov/pls/publications/publication.html

    To preview this tool:
    Institution: U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    Web: http://www.oshainfo.gatech.edu/lead/med-eval.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8636. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  11. International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children (ISAAC)
    Source: University of Auckland
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) was formed in 1991 to facilitate research into asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema by promoting a standardized methodology able to be used in diverse locations around the world. ISAAC developed from a merging of two multi-national collaborative projects, each of which investigated variations in childhood asthma at the population level. ISAAC, with its four phases, has attracted worldwide interest and large-scale participation, and has become the largest worldwide collaborative research project ever undertaken in children. The questionnaires are mostly self-reported by parents and children to evaluate asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema in childhood. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Core questionnaire (study instrument for 13-to-14-year-olds) = Grade 3.5
    Environmental questionnaire = Grade 4.7
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: Phase 1 video questionnaire contains five questions and five corresponding video scenes.
    Phase 3 Core questionnaire: 21 items
    Phase 3 Environmental questionnaire (six to seven years): 28 items
    Phase 3 Environmental questionnaire (13 to 14 years): 19 items
    Other standard questionnaires were used in study phases 2 and 4; neither the questionnaires nor specific information regarding their length and time to complete are provided.
    Time to Complete: Varies depending on modules selected, questionnaire phase, and age group(s).
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Afrikaans, North Sotho, Filipino, Gujarati, Guarani, Xhosa, Amharic, French, Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Malay, Thai, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Arabic, Hebrew, Maltese, Persian, Turkish, Albanian, Kyrgyz, Bulgarian, Croatian, Estonian, Finnish, Georgian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian, Swedish, Uzbek, Serbian, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Sinhala, Tamil, Urdu, Portuguese, Spanish, Macedonian, Romanian, Samoan, Tokelau, Tongan, Basque, Catalan, Dutch, German, Greek, and Italian

    The ISAAC International Data Centre (IIDC) is not authorized to release any translation of the ISAAC questionnaire to non-ISAAC investigators.

    For additional information/specifics about translations for questionnaires from this study reference:
    Web: http://isaac.auckland.ac.nz/resources/tools.php?menu=tools1
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    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Forbes L, Jarvis D, Potts J, Baxter P. Volcanic ash and respiratory symptoms in children on the island of Montserrat, British West Indies. Occup Environ Med. 2003 Mar; 60(3): 207-211. PMCID: PMC 1740482. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1740482/. Subscription not required.

    Asher MI, Keil U, Anderson HR, Beasley R, Crane J, Martinez F, Mitchell EA, Pearce N, Sibbald B, Stewart AW, et al. International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC): rationale and methods. Eur Respir J. 1995 Mar;8(3):483-91. PubMed PMID: 7789502. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7789502. Subscription not required.

    Weiland SK, Bjí¶rksten B, Brunekreef B, Cookson WO, von Mutius E, Strachan DP; International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase II Study Group. Phase II of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC II): rationale and methods. Eur Respir J. 2004 Sep;24(3):406-12. PubMed PMID: 15358699. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15358699. Subscription not required.

    Ellwood P, Asher MI, Beasley R, Clayton TO, Stewart AW; ISAAC Steering Committee. The international study of asthma and allergies in childhood (ISAAC): phase three rationale and methods. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2005 Jan;9(1):10-6. PubMed PMID: 15675544. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15675544. Subscription not required.

    Available Formats: Video

    The ISAAC English language questionnaires and manuals are freely available for non-ISAAC investigators to download and use. However, these must be appropriately referenced in the methodology, and the terms "ISAAC" or "International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood" must not be used in the title of any subsequent publications. It must be made clear to journal editors and readers that research is not part of the ISAAC collaboration to avoid any unnecessary confusion between an ISAAC and non-ISAAC study.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Philippa Ellwood
    Institution: University of Auckland
    Email: p.ellwood@auckland.ac.nz

    Contact person: Innes Asher, ISAAC Chair, Department of Pediatrics: Child and Youth Health, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences
    Institution: University of Auckland
    Address: Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
    Phone: +64 373 7599 ext. 86454
    Fax: + 64 373 7602
    Email: mi.asher@auckland.ac.nz

    For more information:
    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Web: https://www.cdc.gov/asthma/questions.htm
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8622. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  12. SLAITS (State and Local Area Integrated Telephone Survey) National Asthma Survey
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The State and Local Area Integrated Telephone Survey (SLAITS) National Asthma Survey examines the health, socioeconomic, behavioral, and environmental predictors that relate to better control of asthma. It explores the content of care and health care experiences of persons with asthma. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: National Sample = 7.5; Four State Sample = 8.1
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: Each questionnaire (National Sample and Four State Sample versions) contains 10 sections/modules and is extensive in nature. The estimated number of questionnaire items for the national version of this measure is 133; this does not include all multi-part or subset questions. The estimated number of questionnaire items for the four state version of this measure is 138; this does not include all multi-part or subset questions.
    Time to Complete: Public reporting burden for the collection of information for the national version of this survey is estimated to average 10 minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The public reporting burden for the state version of this survey is estimated to average 18 minutes per response.
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
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    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Mauer MP, Herdt-Losavio ML, Carlson GA. Asthma and lower respiratory symptoms in New York State employees who responded to the World Trade Center disaster. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2010 Jan;83(1):21-7. Epub 2009 Nov 5. PubMed PMID: 19890659. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19890659. Subscription required.

    Taylor B, Mannino D, Brown C, Crocker D, Twum-Baah N, Holguin F. Body mass index and asthma severity in the National Asthma Survey. Thorax. 2008 Jan;63(1):14-20. PubMed PMID: 18156567. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18156567. Subscription not required.

    O'Connor KS, Osborn L, Olson L, Blumberg SJ, Frankel MR, Srinath KP, Giambo P. Design and operation of the National Asthma Survey. Vital Health Stat 1. 2008 Aug;(46):1-122. PubMed PMID: 18958992. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18958992. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Division for Health Interview Statistics
    Address: Attention: SLAITS, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 2113, Hyattsville, MD 20782
    Phone: 301-458-4174
    Email: slaits@cdc.gov

    For more information on NCHS and its publications or data files:
    Institution: NCHS Data Dissemination Branch
    Address: 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2003
    Phone: 301-458-INFO (4636); 866-441-NCHS (6247)
    Email: nchsquery@cdc.gov
    Web://www.cdc.gov/nchs/

    For more information:
    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Web: https://www.cdc.gov/asthma/questions.htm; https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_01/sr01_046.pdf

    To preview this tool:
    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Web: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/slaits/revised_nas2003_national_specs.pdf; https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/slaits/revised_nas_sample_specs.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8626. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  13. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) after the Gulf Coast Oil Spill. Alabama, 2010: Appendix A. Gulf Coast Oil Spill CASPER Questionnaire
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: CASPER (Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response), published 9/3/2010, is an epidemiologic technique designed to provide household-based information about an affected community's needs after a disaster quickly and at low cost. The survey instrument includes questions regarding respiratory, cardiovascular, dermatologic, and other physical symptoms and signs that occurred or worsened in the previous 30 days; standardized questions on quality of life, mental health, and social context; as well as individual and household level exposure questions related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 32 questions
    Administered by: Trained Lay Interviewer/Interviewer Administered
    Language(s): English
    Special Considerations: Interview/Questionnaire was conducted at participant's home.
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    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Questionnaire is located in Appendix A.

    Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Buttke D, Vagi S, Bayleyegn T, Sircar K, Strine T, Morrison M, Allen M, Wolkin A. Mental health needs assessment after the Gulf Coast oil spill-Alabama and Mississippi, 2010. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Oct;27(5):401-8. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X12001100. Epub 2012 Aug 21. PubMed PMID: 22985680.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22985680. Subscription required.

    Buttke D, Vagi S, Schnall A, Bayleyegn T, Morrison M, Allen M, Wolkin A. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) one year following the Gulf Coast oil spill: Alabama and Mississippi, 2011. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Dec;27(6):496-502. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X12001380. Epub 2012
    Sep 25. PubMed PMID: 23010443.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23010443. Subscription required.

    Contact information:
    Contact person: Amy Wolkin
    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Phone: 770-488-3402
    Email: ajf9@cdc.gov

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Studies Branch
    Phone: 770-488-3403
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11091. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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