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Displaying records 1 - 20 of 134

of 7
 
 
  1. BRFSS (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System) Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Module
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 3/2/2016
    Annotation: The BRFSS (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System) Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) module was adapted from the original CDC-Kaiser ACE Study and is used to collect information on child abuse and neglect, and household challenges. Childhood experiences, both positive and negative, have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. The ACE score, a total sum of the different categories of ACEs reported by participants, is used to assess cumulative childhood stress. Study findings repeatedly reveal a graded dose-response relationship between ACEs and negative health and well-being outcomes across the life course. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.5
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 11 questions
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer
    Language(s): English, Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Tursich M, Neufeld RW, Frewen PA, Harricharan S, Kibler JL, Rhind SG, Lanius RA. Association of trauma exposure with proinflammatory activity: a transdiagnostic meta-analysis. Transl Psychiatry. 2014;4:e413. doi: 10.1038/tp.2014.56. Epub 2014 Jul 23. PubMed PMID: 25050993; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4119223. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25050993. Subscription not required.

    Contact Information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Web: https://wwwn.cdc.gov/dcs/ContactUs/Form
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 13464. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  2. Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5: Child/Adolescent Version (CAPS-CA-5)
    Source: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder]
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 2015
    Annotation: The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5, Child/Adolescent Version (CAPS-CA-5) is a 30-item clinician-administered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) scale based upon DSM-5 criteria for children and adolescents ages 7 and above. It is a modified version of the CAPS-5 that includes age appropriate items and picture response options, and assesses the 20 DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 30 questions
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Olliac B, Birmes P, Bui E, Allenou C, Brunet A, Claudet I, Sales de Gauzy J, Grandjean H, Raynaud JP. Validation of the French version of the Child Post-Traumatic Stress Reaction Index: psychometric properties in French speaking school-aged children. PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e112603. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112603. Epub 2014 Dec 3. PubMed PMID: 25460912; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4252028. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25460912. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD
    Phone: 802-296-6300
    Email: ncptsd@va.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 13476. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  3. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS)
    Source: Psychology Foundation of Australia
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 11/10/2014
    Annotation: The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) is a set of three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety, and stress. The DASS furthers the process of defining, understanding, and measuring the ubiquitous and clinically significant emotional states usually described as depression, anxiety, and stress. The DASS should meet the requirements of both researchers and scientist-professional clinicians. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 42 or 21 questions
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert, Lay Interviewer
    Language(s): English, Albanian, Arabic, Bangla, Bosnian, Chinese, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dari, Dutch, Filipino, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Malaysian, Marathi, Norwegian, Pashto, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Sinhala, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, Taiwanese, Tamil, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Kaplan BJ, Rucklidge JJ, Romijn AR, Dolph M. A randomised trial of nutrient supplements to minimise psychological stress after a natural disaster. Psychiatry Res. 2015 Aug 30;228(3):373-9. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.05.080. Epub 2015 Jul 15. PubMed PMID: 26154816. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26154816. Subscription required.

    Carter FA, Bell CJ, Ali AN, McKenzie J, Wilkinson TJ. The impact of major earthquakes on the psychological functioning of medical students: a Christchurch, New Zealand study. N Z Med J. 2014 Jul 18;127(1398):54-66. Epub 2014 Aug 26. PubMed PMID: 25146861. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25146861. Subscription required.

    Musa R, Draman S, Jeffrey S, Jeffrey I, Abdullah N, Halim NA, Wahab NA, Mukhtar NZ, Johari SN, Rameli N, Midin M, Nik Jaafar NR, Das S, Sidi H. Post tsunami psychological impact among survivors in Aceh and West Sumatra, Indonesia. Compr Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;55 Suppl 1:S13-6. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2012.12.002. Epub 2013 Jan 16. PubMed PMID: 23318005. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23318005. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Professor Peter Lovibond
    Address: School of Psychology, University of New South Wales
    Phone: 61-2-9385-3830
    Email: P.Lovibond@unsw.edu.au
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12972. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  4. Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) (2014)
    Source: University of Missouri Disaster and Community Crisis Center (DCC)
    Format: PDF (1.8 MB)
    Date Published: 9/2014
    Annotation: This 57-page document is a guide to Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI), a group intervention designed for use with children and adolescents to help participants identify thoughts, feelings, and coping strategies related to issues that may arise following a disaster, traumatic event, or problematic experience, as well as issues reflecting developmental challenges and the usual stresses of daily life. It includes a strengths-based child assessment. It was co-produced with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and the Oklahoma College of Medicine. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Authors: Allen, Sandra
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9915. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  5. Caregiver Self-Assessment Questionnaire
    Source: American Medical Association (AMA)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 7/2014
    Annotation: The Caregiver Health Self-Assessment Questionnaire was originally developed and tested by the American Medical Association. The questionnaire can help caregivers look at their own behavior and health risks. With their healthcare provider's help, this questionnaire can also help caregivers make decisions that may benefit both the caregiver and the older person. The questionnaire can help healthcare providers to identify and provide preventive services to an at-risk population that may be hidden. It may also improve communication and enhance the healthcare provider-caregiver health partnership. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7
    Population: High Risk/Special/Unique Populations
    Length: 18 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Greek, Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Occupational Health; Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Epstein-Lubow G, Gaudiano BA, Hinckley M, Salloway S, Miller I.W. Evidence for the validity of the American Medical Association's Caregiver Self-Assessment Questionnaire as a screening measure for depression. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Feb;58(2):387-8. PubMed PMID: 20370867. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20370867. Subscription required.

    Roberts YH, Huang CY, Crusto CA, Kaufman JS. Health, emergency department use, and early identification of young children exposed to trauma. J Emerg Med. 2014 May;46(5):719-24. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2013.11.086. Epub 2014 Feb 26. PubMed PMID: 24565881; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4004686. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24565881. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: American Geriatrics Society
    Email: info@healthinaging.org
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12889. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. Athens Insomnia Scale
    Source: University of Toronto
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 9/2013
    Annotation: Insomnia is widely measured using the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS). Insomnia is measured by assessing eight factors: five factors are related to nocturnal sleep, and three factors are related to daytime dysfunction. These measures are rated on a 0-3 scale, and the sleep is finally evaluated from the cumulative score of all factors and reported as an individual's sleep outcome. AIS is considered to be an effective tool in sleep analysis, and is validated in various countries based on local patients. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 12.9
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 8 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Afrikaans, Arabic, Bangla, Cantonese, Finnish, French, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Mandarin, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbo-Croat, SiSwati, Slovak, Spanish, Ukrainian, Xhosa, Yoruba, Zulu
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Tsuchiya M, Aida J, Hagiwara Y, Sugawara Y, Tomata Y, Sato M, Watanabe T, Tomita H, Nemoto E, Watanabe M, Osaka K, Tsuji I. Periodontal Disease Is Associated with Insomnia among Victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake: A Panel Study Initiated Three Months after the Disaster. Tohoku J Exp Med. 2015;237(2):83-90. doi: 10.1620/tjem.237.83. Epub 2015 Sep 18. PubMed PMID: 26377351. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26377351. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dr. Colin Shapiro
    Institution: University of Toronto
    Address: 399 Bathurst Street, Suite-MP7 Room 421, Toronto, ON, M5T 2S8
    Phone: 416-603-5273
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12948. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  7. Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS)
    Source: National Institutes of Health, Disaster Research Response Program (DR2)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2/2013
    Annotation: The Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS) is a five-item patient self-report measure, which assesses the impact of a person's mental health in terms of work, home management, social leisure, private leisure, and personal or family relationships. The WSAS is used for all patients with depression or anxiety, as well as phobic disorders. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 9.4
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 5 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Mataix-Cols D, Cowley AJ, Hankins M, Schneider A, Bachofen M, Kenwright M, Gega L, Cameron R, Marks IM. Reliability and validity of the Work and Social Adjustment Scale in phobic disorders. Compr Psychiatry. 2005 May-June;46(3):223-8. PubMed PMID: 16021593. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16021593. Subscription required.

    Mundt JC, Marks IM, Greist JH, Shear K.(2002) The Work and Social Adjustment Scale: A simple accurate measure of impairment in functioning. Brit J Psychiatry. 2002 May;180:461-4. PMID: 11983645. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11983645. Subscription not required.

    Silove D, Liddell B, Rees S, Chey T, Nickerson A, Tam N, Zwi AB, Brooks R, Sila LL, Steel Z. Effects of recurrent violence on post-traumatic stress disorder and severe distress in conflict-affected Timor-Leste: a 6-year longitudinal study. Lancet Glob Health. 2014 May;2(5):e293-300. doi: 10.1016/s2214-109x(14)70196-2. Epub 2014 Aug 12. PubMed PMID: 25103168. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25103168. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Serenity Programme
    Web: http://serene.me.uk/info-contact.php
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12888. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  8. NIH (National Institutes of Health) Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function
    Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 10/2012
    Annotation: This toolbox is a multi-dimensional set of brief measures assessing cognitive, emotional, motor, and sensory function from ages 3 to 85, meeting the need for a standard set of measures that can be used as a "common currency" across diverse study designs and settings. It uses multiple constructs of the four domains: Cognition, Emotion, Motor, and Sensation. Cognition and Emotion have the more relevant instruments for post-disaster data collection. Cognition includes Executive Function, Attention, Episodic Memory, Language, Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Emotion includes Psychological Well-Being, Social Relationships, Stress and Self Efficacy, and Negative Affect. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 7968. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  9. Victorian Disaster Mental Health Workforce Capacity Survey
    Source: University of Melbourne
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 10/2012
    Annotation: The Victorian Disaster Mental Health Workforce Capacity Survey sought to examine the current state (i.e., the nature, scope, profile, and capacity) of the disaster mental health workforce in Victoria. See Appendix A: Survey Template of this document. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 8.4
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 19 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Occupational Health; Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Reifels L, Naccarella L, Blashki G, Pirkis J. Examining disaster mental health workforce capacity. Psychiatry. 2014 Summer;77(2):199-205. doi: 10.1521/psyc.2014.77.2.199. Epub 2014 May 29. PubMed PMID: 24865201. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24865201. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: University of Melbourne
    Address: University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010
    Phone: 13 MELB (13 6352)
    International Phone: +(61 3) 9035 5511
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12935. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  10. NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Common Data Elements
    Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, CounterAct [Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats] Program (NINDS)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 8/2012
    Annotation: This resource is a project to standardize the collection of investigational data in order to facilitate comparison of results across studies and more effectively aggregate information into significant metadata results. It outlines data standards and provides accompanying tools to help investigators and research teams collect and record standardized clinical data. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8091. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  11. Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS)
    Source: Harvard University, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2/2012
    Annotation: The Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS) is a widely used measure of daily perceived discrimination. It is one of the most widely used discrimination scales in epidemiologic and public health research. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 10.2
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 10 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Betancourt TS, McBain RK, Newnham EA, Brennan RT. The intergenerational impact of war: longitudinal relationships between caregiver and child mental health in post conflict Sierra Leone. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;56(10):1101-7. doi: 10.1111/jcpp.12389. Epub 2015 Feb 11. PubMed PMID: 25665018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25665018. Subscription required.

    Krieger N, Smith K, Naishadham D, Hartman C, Barbeau EM. Experiences of discrimination: validity and reliability of a self-report measure for population health research on racism and health. Soc Sci Med. 2005 Oct; 61(7):1576-1596. Epub 2005 Apr 21. PubMed PMID: 16005789. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16005789. Subscription required.

    Taylor TR, Kamarck TW, Shiffman S. Validation of the Detroit area study discrimination scale in a community sample of older African American adults: the Pittsburgh healthy heart project. Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(2):88-94. PubMed PMID: 15456677. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15456677. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: David Williams
    Institution: Harvard University, T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    Address: 677 Huntington Ave., Room 615, Boston, MA 02115
    Email: dwilliam@hsph.harvard.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12903. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  12. Combat Exposure Scale (CES)
    Source: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2012
    Annotation: The Combat Exposure Scale (CES) is a seven-item self-report measure that assesses wartime stressors experienced by combatants. Respondents are asked to respond based on their exposure to various combat situations, such as firing rounds at the enemy and being on dangerous duty. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.5
    Population: Military
    Length: 7 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Keane TM, Fairbank JA, Caddell JM, Zimering RT, Taylor KL, Mora CA. Clinical evaluation of a measure to assess combat exposure. Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1989 Mar;1(1):53.

    Stocker RP, Cieply MA, Paul B, Khan H, Henry L, Kontos AP, Germain A. Combat-related blast exposure and traumatic brain injury influence brain glucose metabolism during REM sleep in military veterans. Neuroimage. 2014 Oct 1;99:207-14. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.05.067. Epub 2014 Jun 4. PubMed PMID: 24893322; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4112017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24893322. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: National Center for PTSD
    Web: http://www.ptsd.va.gov/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12886. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  13. GuLF STUDY: Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study
    Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
    Format: PDF (1 MB)
    Date Published: 9/7/2011
    Annotation: This 184-page report describes the Gulf Long-Term Follow-up (GuLF) Study in detail, including its short- and long-term objectives, design, statistical analysis methods and appendices A-V. The document is also known as the GuLF STUDY Protocol. Companion study materials are available at: https://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/epi/studies/gulfstudy/publications/index.cfm. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Authors: Sandler, Dale P.; Kwok, Richard K. ; Engel, Lawrence S.
    Type: Report
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 5300. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  14. Interview for Children: Traumatic Events Screening Inventory (TESI-C)
    Source: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder]
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 6/16/2011
    Annotation: The Traumatic Events Screening Inventory (TESI-C) protocol is a guide for clinical and/or research interviewing to screen for a child's history of exposure to potentially traumatic experiences. The protocol is designed to help clinicians focus in a systematic fashion on the primary domains of trauma for children, which include direct exposure to or witnessing of severe accidents, illness, or disaster; family or community conflict or violence; and sexual molestation. The questions are arranged to hierarchically review experiences in an order that helps the child tolerate the possible stress of disclosing traumatic experiences: gradually increasing the intimacy of the experiences (i.e., sexual trauma is reserved for the end of the interview), to help the child recall not only physical harm/violence but also incidents of threatened harm and witnessed trauma. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.2
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Fujiwara T, Yagi J, Homma H, Mashiko H, Nagao K, Okuyama M. Clinically significant behavior problems among young children 2 years after the Great East Japan Earthquake. PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e109342. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0109342. Epub 2014 Oct 22. PubMed PMID: 25333762; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4204852. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25333762. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD
    Phone: 802-296-6300
    Email: ncptsd@va.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12896. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  15. Changes in Outlook Questionnaire (CiOQ)
    Source: National Institutes of Health, Disaster Research Response Program (DR2)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2011
    Annotation: The Changes in Outlook Questionnaire (CiOQ) is a retrospective self-report measurement tool that assesses positive and negative change following trauma. This self-report questionnaire asks participants to rate the extent to which they have experienced both positive and negative changes as a result of experiencing a highly stressful event. See pages 134-135 of this report for the specific tool. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 6.8
    Population: Adults only
    Length: 26 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Chinese
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Joseph S, Williams R, Yule W. Changes in outlook following disaster: The preliminary development of a measure to assess positive and negative responses. Journal of Traumatic Stress. 1993 Apr 1;6(2):271-9.

    Tang B, Kang P, Liu X, Liu Y, Liu Z, Wang B, Lv Y, Zhang L. Post-traumatic psychological changes among survivors of the Lushan earthquake living in the most affected areas. Psychiatry Res. 2014 Dec 15;220(1-2):384-90. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.050. Epub 2014 Aug 17. PubMed PMID: 25128250. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25128250. Subscription required.

    Zang Y, Hunt N, Cox T. Adapting narrative exposure therapy for Chinese earthquake survivors: a pilot randomised controlled feasibility study. BMC Psychiatry. 2014;14:262. doi: 10.1186/s12888-014-0262-3. Epub 2014 Jan 1. PubMed PMID: 25927297; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4189751. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25927297. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Stephen Joseph
    Institution: Centre for Trauma, Resilience, and Growth, School of Sociology and Policy
    Address: University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
    Email: stephen.joseph@nottingham.ac.uk
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12958. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  16. Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II (AAQ-II)
    Source: Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2011
    Annotation: The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II (AAQ-II) was developed to establish an internally consistent measure of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)'s model of mental health and behavioral effectiveness. When ACT was originally developed, the overarching term for its underlying model was experiential avoidance: the attempt to alter the form, frequency, or situational sensitivity of negative private events (e.g., thoughts, feelings, and physiological sensations), even when doing so leads to behavioral difficulties. Acceptance was the term used to positively describe this model; it is defined as the willingness to experience (i.e., not alter the form, frequency, or sensitivity of) unwanted private events, in the pursuit of one's values and goals. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 3.3
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 7 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Arabic, Chinese, Danish, Dutch, Farsi, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Miron LR, Orcutt HK, Kumpula MJ. Differential predictors of transient stress versus post-traumatic stress disorder: evaluating risk following targeted mass violence. Behav Ther. 2014 Nov;45(6):791-805. doi: 10.1016/j.beth.2014.07.005. Epub 2014 Oct 15. PubMed PMID: 25311288; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4218730. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25311288. Subscription not required.

    Orcutt HK, Bonanno GA, Hannan SM, Miron LR. Prospective trajectories of post-traumatic stress in college women following a campus mass shooting. J Trauma Stress. 2014 Jun;27(3):249-56. doi: 10.1002/jts.21914. Epub 2014 May 14. PubMed PMID: 24819209; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4218731. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24819209. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Association for Contextual Behavioral Science
    Web: https://contextualscience.org/contact
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12930. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  17. Child Psychosocial Distress Screener (CPDS)
    Source: Children and War Foundation
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 5/2010
    Annotation: The Child Psychosocial Distress Screener (CPDS) is a multi-source instrument that assesses non-specific child psychosocial distress and the likelihood of need for psychosocial treatment. The instrument is developed as a primary screener in conflict-affected community settings (especially low- and middle-income settings), for children between 8 and 14 years old. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.8
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 7 questions
    Administered by: Trained Lay Examiner/Interviewer Administration, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Yim ES, Macy RD, Ciottone G. Medical and psychosocial needs of Olympic and Pan American athletes after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti: an opportunity to promote resilience through sports medicine and public diplomacy. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Apr;29(2):195-9. doi: 10.1017/s1049023x14000302. Epub 2014 Apr 12. PubMed PMID: 24721144. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24721144. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Children and War Foundation
    Address: Kluge Law Firm, Postboks 394 Sentrum, N-5805 Bergen, Norway
    Email: contact@childrenandwar.org
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 13472. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  18. Beery VMI (Visual-Motor Integration): Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration, 6th Edition
    Source: National Institutes of Health, Disaster Research Response Program (DR2)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 2010
    Annotation: The Beery Visual-Motor Integration (VMI) measures the extent to which individuals can integrate their visual and motor abilities. It is commonly used to identify children who are having significant difficulty with visual-motor integration and to determine the most appropriate course of action. The Beery VMI is suitable for respondents with diverse environmental, educational, and linguistic backgrounds. Additionally, the test can be used as an outcome measure to assess the effectiveness of education and intervention programs. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 30 items
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Proprietary-Cost/Purchase required. This tool is available only in Canada.

    Citation(s):
    Cao X, Laplante DP, Brunet A, Ciampi A, King S. Prenatal maternal stress affects motor function in 5(1/2)-year-old children: project ice storm. Dev Psychobiol. 2014 Jan;56(1):117-25. doi: 10.1002/dev.21085. Epub 2012 Nov 13. PubMed PMID: 23143986. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23143986. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: MHS Inc.
    Address: P.O. Box 950, North Tonawanda, NY, 14120-0950
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12908. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  19. PROMIS (Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System): Dynamic Tools to Measure Health Outcomes from the Patient Perspective
    Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 2010
    Annotation: This resource is a system of highly reliable, precise measures of patient-reported health status for physical, mental, and social well-being. PROMIS® tools measure what patients are able to do and how they feel by asking questions. PROMIS measures can be used as primary or secondary endpoints in clinical studies of the effectiveness of treatment, and PROMIS® tools can be used across a wide variety of chronic diseases and conditions and in the general population. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Database/Dataset
    Access Notes: Selected PROMIS tools are also available in Spanish.
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8090. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  20. Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF)
    Source: National Institutes of Health, Disaster Research Response Program (DR2)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 12/2009
    Annotation: The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) is a questionnaire developed for parents and teachers of school-age children to assess executive function behaviors in the school and home environments. Designed to assess the abilities of a broad range of children and adolescents, the BRIEF is useful when working with children who have learning disabilities and attention disorders, traumatic brain injuries, lead exposure, pervasive developmental disorders, depression, and other developmental, neurological, psychiatric, and medical conditions. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 86 items
    Administered by: Parent/Teacher Administered, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Proprietary - Cost/Purchase required

    Citation(s):
    Yang R, Xiang YT, Shuai L, Qian Y, Lai KY, Ungvari GS, Chiu HF, Wang YF. Executive function in children and adolescents with post-traumatic stress disorder 4 and 12 months after the Sichuan earthquake in China. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;55(1):31-8. doi: 10.1111/jcpp.12089. Epub 2013 Jun 5. PubMed PMID: 23730971. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23730971. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: PAR Customer Support
    Phone: 800-331-8378
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12910. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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