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The Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health.

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Displaying records 281 - 287 of 287

of 15
 
 
  1. Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS)
    Source: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) is a measure of global cognitive judgments of one's life satisfaction (not a measure of either positive or negative affect). To complete the scale, participants indicate how much they agree or disagree with each of the five items using a seven-point scale that ranges from 7 (strongly agree) to 1 (strongly disagree). This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 6.3
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: Five questions
    Time to Complete: 1-5 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Portuguese, Persian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Setswana, Spanish, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Arabic, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindu, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Japanese, Khmer, Korean and Norwegian

    To obtain translations of this tool, visit: http://internal.psychology.illinois.edu/~ediener/SWLS.html
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    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Bei B, Bryant C, Gilson KM, Koh J, Gibson P, Komiti A, Jackson A, Judd F. A prospective study of the impact of floods on the mental and physical health of older adults. Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(8):992-1002. Epub 2013 May 28. PubMed PMID: 23711204. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23711204. Subscription Required.

    Diener E, Emmons RA, Larsen RJ, Griffin S. The Satisfaction With Life Scale. J Pers Assess. 1985 Feb;49(1):71-5. PubMed PMID: 16367493. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16367493. Subscription required.

    Pavot W, Diener E, Colvin CR, Sandvik E. Further validation of the Satisfaction with Life Scale: evidence for the cross-method convergence of well-being measures. J Pers Assess. 1991 Aug;57(1):149-61. PubMed PMID: 1920028. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1920028. Subscription required.

    Corrigan JD, Kolakowsky-Hayner S, Wright J, Bellon K, Carufel P. The satisfaction with life scale. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2013 Nov-Dec;28(6):489-91. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000004. PubMed PMID: 24189288. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24189288. Subscription required.

    The scale is copyrighted but it is free for use without permission or charge by all professionals (researchers and practitioners) as long as proper credit is given to the authors of the scale: Ed Diener, Robert A. Emmons, Randy J. Larsen, and Sharon Griffin, as noted in the 1985 article in the Journal of Personality Assessment.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Professor Ed Diener
    Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Psychology
    Address: 603 E. Daniel Street, Champaign, IL 61820
    Phone: 217-333-4804
    Fax: 217-244-5876
    Email: ediener@illinois.edu

    For more information:
    Institution: Fetzer Institute
    Web: http://www.fetzer.org/sites/default/files/images/stories/pdf/selfmeasures/SATISFACTION-SatisfactionWithLife.pdf

    Institution: University of Pennsylvania, Positive Psychology Center
    Web: http://ppc.sas.upenn.edu/resources/questionnaires-researchers/satisfaction-life-scale

    Institution: Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Sciences (MIDSS)
    Web: http://www.midss.org/content/satisfaction-life-scale-swl
    +P21
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9002. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  2. Social Provisions Scale (SPS)
    Source: Iowa State University
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Social Provisions Scale was developed to assess the provisions of social relationships. These provisions reflect what people receive from relationships with other people. The six provisions are guidance (advice or information), reliable alliance (assurance that others can be counted on in times of stress), reassurance of worth (recognition of one's competence), attachment (emotional closeness), social integration (a sense of belonging to a group of friends), and opportunity for nurturance (providing assistance to others). The goal of this measure is to examine the degree to which a respondent's social relationships provide various dimensions of social support. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.4
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 24 questions
    Time to Complete: 5 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, French, and Urdu
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    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Chan CS, Rhodes JE. Religious coping, posttraumatic stress, psychological distress, and posttraumatic growth among female survivors four years after Hurricane Katrina. J Trauma Stress. 2013 Apr;26(2):257-65. Epub 2013 Mar 25. PubMed PMID: 23529889. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23529889. Subscription required.

    Russell D, Cutrona CE, Rose J, Yurko K. Social and emotional loneliness: an examination of Weiss's typology of loneliness. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1984 Jun;46(6):1313-21. PubMed PMID: 6737214. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6737214. Subscription required.

    Cutrona CE. Social support and stress in the transition to parenthood. J Abnorm Psychol. 1984 Nov;93(4):378-90. PubMed PMID: 6512084. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6512084. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: David R. Russell, Professor of English
    Address: Iowa State University, 2300 Palmer Building, Ames, Iowa 50011
    Phone: 515-294-4724
    Fax: 515-294-6814
    Email: drrussel@iastate.edu

    For more information:
    Institution: National Cancer Institute, U.S National Institutes of Health
    Web: http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/brp/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9004. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  3. Subjective Happiness Scale
    Source: University of California, Riverside (UCR)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) is a four-item scale of global subjective happiness. Each item is completed by choosing one of seven options that finish a given sentence fragment. The options are different for each of the four questions. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.7
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: Four questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Welsh, Urdu, Spanish, French, Arabic, Greek, Tagalog, Malay, Japanese, Chinese, Turkish, German, and Russian
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    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Vera-Villarroel P, Zych I, Celis-Atenas K, Córdova-Rubio N,Buela-Casal G. Chilean validation of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C) after the earthquake on February 27, 2010. Psychol Rep. 2011 Aug;109(1):47-58. PubMed PMID: 22049647. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22049647. Subscription required.

    Lyubomirsky S, Ross L. Hedonic consequences of social comparison: a contrast of happy and unhappy people. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1997 Dec;73(6):1141-57. PubMed PMID: 9418274. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9418274. Subscription required.

    Lyubomirsky S, Ross L. Changes in attractiveness of elected, rejected, and precluded alternatives: a comparison of happy and unhappy individuals. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1999 Jun;76(6):988-1007. PubMed PMID: 10402682. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10402682. Subscription required.

    Lyubomirsky S, Lepper HS. A measure of subjective happiness: Preliminary reliability and construct validation. Soc Indic Res. 1999;46(2):137-155. http://my.psychologytoday.com/files/attachments/496/subjective-happiness-scale.pdf. Subscription not required.

    Permission is granted for all non-commercial use. Please cite the following scale validation paper in all work mentioning the scale:
    Lyubomirsky S, Lepper H. A measure of subjective happiness: Preliminary reliability and construct validation. Soc Indic Res. 1999;46:137-155. The original publication of the aforementioned citation is available at http://www.springerlink.com.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky
    Institution: University of California, Riverside, Department of Psychology
    Address: Riverside, CA 92521
    Phone: 951-827-5041
    Fax: 951-827-3985
    Email: sonja.lyubomirsky@ucr.edu
    Web: http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/; http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/subjective-happiness-scale-shs/

    For more information:
    Institution: University of Pennsylvania, Positive Psychology Center
    Web: http://ppc.sas.upenn.edu/resources/questionnaires-researchers/subjective-happiness-scale

    Institution: Fetzer Institute
    Web: http://www.fetzer.org/sites/default/files/images/stories/pdf/selfmeasures/SATISFACTION-SubjectiveHappiness.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9005. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  4. Social Support Scale for Children
    Source: University of Denver (DU)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: This commercially available instrument consists of three competence domains: Cognitive, Social, and Physical, as well as a subscale measuring general feelings of self-worth. It is a 28-item scale designed for children over age eight and has also been adapted specifically for adolescents. The Social Support Scale portion of this instrument was designed to examine perceived support and global self-worth based on the perceived regard from others. Within the social support scale, there are four subscales: Parent, teacher, close friend, and classmate-based support. Each scale examines the extent to which a child is understood; listened to; has someone to talk to about matters that concern him/her or to help address challenges and problems; and the degree to which children are treated fairly and appreciated for who they are on a fundamental level. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 8.4
    Population: Children/Teens only
    Length: The overall competence measure contains seven items for each of the four scales, for a total of 28 questions. However, a more recently revised version (dated 2012) of the social support portion of the questionnaire states that there are 24 total questions for this particular section, with each subscale containing six items.
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Spanish, Dutch, and Finnish
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    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    La Greca AM, Lai BS, Joormann J, Auslander BB, Short MA. Children's risk and resilience following a natural disaster: genetic vulnerability, posttraumatic stress, and depression. J Affect Disord. 2013 Dec;151(3):860-7. Epub 2013 Aug 16. PubMed PMID: 24035489. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24035489. Subscription required.

    Harter, S. Manual for the Social Support Scale for Children. Denver, CO: University of Denver, 1985. https://portfolio.du.edu/downloadItem/224451. Subscription not required.

    Wichstrí¸m L. Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: reliability, validity, and evaluation of the question format. J Pers Assess. 1995 Aug;65(1):100-16. PubMed PMID: 7643294. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7643294. Subscription required.

    Van den Bergh BR, Van Ranst N. Self-concept in children: equivalence of measurement and structure across gender and grade of Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children. J Pers Assess. 1998 Jun;70(3):564-82. PubMed PMID: 9760744. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9760744. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Susan Harter
    Institution: University of Denver
    Address: University Park, Denver, CO 80208
    Phone: 303-871-2000
    Email: sharter@du.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9006. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  5. Disaster Response and Recovery Needs of Communities Affected by the Elk River Chemical Spill, West Virginia: Appendix A: West Virginia CASPER Questionnaire-April 2014
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The questionnaire is located in Appendix A on page 65. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 33 multi-part questions
    Special Considerations: Interview/Questionnaire was conducted at participant's home.
    Administered by: Trained Lay Examiner/Interviewer Administered
    Language(s): English
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    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11090. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) after the Gulf Coast Oil Spill. Alabama, 2010: Appendix A. Gulf Coast Oil Spill CASPER Questionnaire
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: CASPER (Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response), published 9/3/2010, is an epidemiologic technique designed to provide household-based information about an affected community's needs after a disaster quickly and at low cost. The survey instrument includes questions regarding respiratory, cardiovascular, dermatologic, and other physical symptoms and signs that occurred or worsened in the previous 30 days; standardized questions on quality of life, mental health, and social context; as well as individual and household level exposure questions related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 32 questions
    Administered by: Trained Lay Interviewer/Interviewer Administered
    Language(s): English
    Special Considerations: Interview/Questionnaire was conducted at participant's home.
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Questionnaire is located in Appendix A.

    Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Buttke D, Vagi S, Bayleyegn T, Sircar K, Strine T, Morrison M, Allen M, Wolkin A. Mental health needs assessment after the Gulf Coast oil spill-Alabama and Mississippi, 2010. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Oct;27(5):401-8. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X12001100. Epub 2012 Aug 21. PubMed PMID: 22985680.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22985680. Subscription required.

    Buttke D, Vagi S, Schnall A, Bayleyegn T, Morrison M, Allen M, Wolkin A. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) one year following the Gulf Coast oil spill: Alabama and Mississippi, 2011. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Dec;27(6):496-502. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X12001380. Epub 2012
    Sep 25. PubMed PMID: 23010443.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23010443. Subscription required.

    Contact information:
    Contact person: Amy Wolkin
    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Phone: 770-488-3402
    Email: ajf9@cdc.gov

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Studies Branch
    Phone: 770-488-3403
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11091. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  7. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [ICPSR]
    Source: University of Michigan
    Format: Text
    Annotation: ICPSR seeks research data and pertinent documents from researchers, including PIs, research agencies, and government entities. We process, preserve, and disseminate the data and documents. We also provide education, training, and instructional resources to help users understand and analyze research data. Approximately 760 universities, government agencies, and other institutions are members of ICPSR. Faculty, staff, and students of member institutions have full direct access to the data archive and to all of ICPSR's services. Everyone affiliated with a member institution receives full access to the data archive of more than 8,000 research studies. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: All/Anyone
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Database/Dataset
    Access Notes: Site requires free registration. Permission/Request required

    Phone: (734)647-2200
    Email: help@icpsr.umich.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12947. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Displaying records 281 - 287 of 287

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