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Displaying records 281 - 299 of 299

of 15
 
 
  1. Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6)
    Source: Stanford University
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) evaluates the impact of health problems on individual work performance and overall perceived productivity for knowledge-based activity. The SPS-6 results are proposed for monitoring and measurement of interventions and improvement of employee health status and productivity. The SPS-6 targets the general working population with more than a high school education. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Population: Workplace
    Length: Six questions
    Time to Complete: Not specified/given
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Languages: English, Japanese, Portuguese, and Dutch
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    Data Collection on: Occupational Health
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    McKibben JB, Fullerton CS, Ursano RJ, Reissman DB, Kowalski-Trakofler K, Shultz JM, Wang L. Sleep and arousal as risk factors for adverse health and work performance in public health workers involved in the 2004 Florida hurricane season. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2010 Sep;4 Suppl 1:S55-62. PubMed PMID: 23105036. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23105036. Subscription required.

    Koopman C, Pelletier KR, Murray JF, Sharda CE, Berger ML, Turpin RS, Hackleman P, Gibson P, Holmes DM, Bendel T. Stanford presenteeism scale: health status and employee productivity. J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jan;44(1):14-20. PubMed PMID: 11802460
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11802460. Subscription required.

    Turpin RS, Ozminkowski RJ, Sharda CE, Collins JJ, Berger ML, Billotti GM, Baase CM, Olson MJ, Nicholson S. Reliability and validity of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale. J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Nov;46(11):1123-33. PubMed PMID: 15534499. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15534499. Subscription required.

    Frauendorf R, de Medeiros Pinheiro M, Ciconelli RM. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Stanford presenteeism scale-6 and work instability scale for ankylosing spondylitis. Clin Rheumatol. 2013 Nov 13. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24221505. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24221505. Subscription required.

    Hutting N, Engels JA, Heerkens YF, Staal JB, Nijhuis-van der Sanden MW. Development and measurement properties of the Dutch version of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6). J Occup Rehabil. 2014 Jun;24(2):268-77. doi: 10.1007/s10926-013-9453-x. PubMed PMID: 23868673. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23868673. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier, PhD
    Institution: American Health Association
    Address: 1990 North California Boulevard, Suite 830, Walnut Creek, CA 94596
    Phone: 925-932-7074
    Email: meaghang@email.arizona.edu

    Additional contact information for Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier, PhD:
    Address: 5 Country Oak Lane, Alamo, CA 94507-2854
    Phone: 925-932-7074

    For more information:
    Institution: National Business Coalition on Health
    Web: http://www.nbch.org/Health-Promotion-Tools-and-Resources

    Institution: Stanford School of Medicine, Center on Stress and Health
    Web: http://stresshealthcenter.stanford.edu/research/measures.html

    Institution: Association of American Medical Colleges
    Web: https://www.mededportal.org/publication/9602
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8649. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  2. New York State Department of Health Community Reception Center (CRC) Form
    Source: New York State Department of Health
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The New York State Department of Health Community Reception Center (NYSDOH CRC) form is the product of the New York State Department of Health, Center for Environmental Health, and Countermeasure and Response Administration (CRA) system that was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to support all hazards countermeasure tracking for any countermeasure and any event. The NYSDOH CRC questionnaire form contains items pertaining to potential radiation routes of contamination, contact information and demographics, exposure information, clinical symptoms, and medical history. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 16 questions, four sections
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
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    Data Collection on: Occupational Health
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Currently, there are no available publications that address the use of this tool or data gathered from this measure.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Address: 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30333
    Phone: 1-800-CDC-INFO (232-4636)/TTY: 1-888-232-6348
    Email: cdcinfo@cdc.gov, ctshelp@cdc.gov, crahelp@cdc.gov
    Web site: http://www.cdc.gov; https://www.cdc.gov/cts/cra/index.html

    Institution: Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education
    Web: http://www.orau.gov/rsb/vcrc/; http://www.orau.gov/rsb/vcrc/508/index.asp?p=0

    Institution: New York State Department of Health
    Address: Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237
    Email: dohweb@health.state.ny.us

    Institution: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
    Web: http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/em/improvised_nuclear_device.shtml
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8650. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  3. Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R)
    Source: University of Miami (UM)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R) was developed as an abbreviated and improved measure to the LOT; it examines individual differences in generalized optimism versus pessimism. It is important to note that this measure is a research instrument and is not intended for clinical applications. There are no "cut-offs" for optimism or pessimism; instead, it is used as a continuous dimension of variability. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.2
    Population: Adults and teens
    Length: 10 questions
    Time to Complete: 3-10 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Serbian, French, Spanish, Dutch, Greek, Chinese, German, Japanese, and Portuguese (Brazil)

    Serbian translation: http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/sclSerbianLOT.html

    French translation: http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/sclFrenchLOT.html

    Spanish Translation: http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/sclspan.html

    German translation: http://www.detect-studie.de/Instrumente/LOT_R_Websiteinfo.pdf
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    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Chan CS, Rhodes JE. Religious coping, posttraumatic stress, psychological distress, and posttraumatic growth among female survivors four years after Hurricane Katrina. J Trauma Stress. 2013 Apr;26(2):257-65. Epub 2013 Mar 25. PubMed PMID: 23529889. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23529889. Subscription required.

    Herzberg PY, Glaesmer H, Hoyer J. Separating optimism and pessimism: a robust psychometric analysis of the revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R). Psychol Assess. 2006 Dec;18(4):433-8. PubMed PMID: 17154764. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17154764. Subscription required.

    Segerstrom SC, Evans DR, Eisenlohr-Moul TA. Optimism and pessimism dimensions in the Life Orientation Test-Revised: Method and meaning. J Res Pers. 2011;45(1): 126-129. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092656610001613. Subscription required.

    Glaesmer H, Rief W, Martin A, Mewes R, Brähler E, Zenger M, Hinz A. Psychometric properties and population-based norms of the Life Orientation Test Revised (LOT-R). Br J Health Psychol. 2012 May;17(2):432-45. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8287.2011.02046.x. Epub 2011 Jul 21. PubMed PMID: 22106985. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22106985. Subscription required.

    Monzani D, Steca P, Greco A. Brief report: Assessing dispositional optimism in adolescence-Factor structure and concurrent validity of the Life Orientation Test-Revised. J Adolesc. 2014;37(2): 97-101. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014019711300170X. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dr. Charles S. Carver
    Institution: University of Miami, Department of Psychology
    Address: P.O. Box 248185, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0751
    Phone: 305-284-2817
    Fax: 305-284-3402
    Email: ccarver@miami.edu
    Web: http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/

    For more information:
    Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Sciences
    Web: http://www.midss.org/; http://www.midss.org/sites/default/files/lot-r.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8987. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  4. World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL)-100
    Source: World Health Organization (WHO)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-100) instrument is a generic, patient-completed measure of health-related quality of life that was simultaneously developed in 15 sites worldwide. It is focused around the definition of quality of life advocated by the World Health Organization, which includes culture and context that influence an individual's perception of health. The instrument has a modular structure and is organized into five broad domains: physical health (bodily states and functions), psychological health, level of independence and social relationships, and environment. The WHOQOL-100 is one of the most commonly used standard QOL measures in existence. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 9.9
    Population: Adults only
    Length: 100 questions, 24 subscales, six domains
    Time to Complete: 10-20 minutes
    Administered by: Self administered/self report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Greek, Estonian, Arabic, Bulgarian, Chinese, Czech, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, German, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Zambia, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Korean, Lithuanian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Shona, Slovak, Swedish, Spanish, Tamil, Urdu, and Turkish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Osofsky HJ, Osofsky JD, Hansel TC. Deepwater horizon oil spill: mental health effects on residents in heavily affected areas. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2011 Dec;5(4):280-6. PubMed PMID: 22146666. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146666. Subscription required.

    Study protocol for the World Health Organization project to develop a Quality of Life assessment instrument (WHOQOL). Qual Life Res. 1993 Apr;2(2):153-9. PubMed PMID: 8518769. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8518769. Subscription required.

    The World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment (WHOQOL): position paper from the World Health Organization. Soc Sci Med. 1995 Nov;41(10):1403-9. PubMed PMID: 8560308. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8560308. Subscription required.

    The World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL): development and general psychometric properties. Soc Sci Med. 1998 Jun;46(12):1569-85. PubMed PMID: 9672396. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9672396. Subscription required.

    Bonomi AE, Patrick DL, Bushnell DM, Martin M. Validation of the United States' version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL) instrument. J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Jan;53(1):1-12. PubMed PMID: 10693897. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10693897. Subscription required.

    The WHOQOL-100 and WHO-BREF (another available version of the WHOQOL) require permission to use, so please reference contact information for additional details. The WHOQOL-HIV and the WHOQOL-SRPB are freely available and accessible to the public through the official WHO site.

    Contact information:

    Institution: World Health Organization, WHOQOL Group, Program on Mental Health, Division of Mental Health and Prevention of Substance Abuse
    Address: CH-1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
    Phone: 41 22 791 3610 or 4739 or 3634
    Fax: 41 22 791 4160
    Email: whoqol@who.ch, WHOQOL@who.int, or chatterjis@who.int
    Web: http://www.who.int/mental_health/publications/whoqol/en/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8989. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  5. World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF)
    Source: World Health Organization (WHO)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF instrument comprises 26 items, which measure the following broad domains: physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment. The WHOQOL-BREF is a shorter version of the original instrument that may be more convenient for use in large research studies or clinical trials. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.9
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 26 questions
    Administered by: Self Report/Self Administered, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Chinese, Czech, Farsi, Indonesian, Polish, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Thai, Turkish, Persian, Hindi, Malay/Malayalam, Korean, Dutch, and Danish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Suzuki Y, Tsutsumi A, Fukasawa M, Honma H, Someya T, Kim Y. Prevalence of mental disorders and suicidal thoughts among community-dwelling elderly adults 3 years after the niigata-chuetsu earthquake. J Epidemiol. 2011;21(2):144-50. Epub 2011 Feb 12. PubMed PMID:21325733. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21325733. Subscription not required.

    Development of the World Health Organization WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment. The WHOQOL Group. Psychol Med. 1998 May;28(3):551-8. PubMed PMID: 9626712. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9626712. Subscription required.

    Skevington SM, Lotfy M, O'Connell KA; WHOQOL Group. The World Health Organization's WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment: psychometric properties and results of the international field trial. A report from the WHOQOL group. Qual Life Res. 2004 Mar;13(2):299-310. PubMed PMID: 15085902. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15085902. Subscription required.

    Vahedi S. World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF): Analyses of Their Item Response Theory Properties Based on the Graded Responses Model. Iran J Psychiatry. 2010 Fall;5(4):140-53. PubMed PMID: 22952508; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3395923. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952508. Subscription not required.

    The WHOQOL-BREF and WHOQOL-100 (another available version of the WHOQOL) require permission to use, so please reference contact information for additional details. The WHOQOL-HIV and the WHOQOL-SRPB are freely available and accessible to the public through the official WHO site.

    Contact information:

    Institution: World Health Organization, WHOQOL Group, Program on Mental Health, Division of Mental Health and Prevention of Substance Abuse
    Address: CH-1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
    Phone: 41 22 791 3610 or 4739 or 3634
    Fax: 41 22 791 4160
    Email: whoqol@who.ch, WHOQOL@who.int, or chatterjis@who.int
    Web: http://www.who.int/mental_health/publications/whoqol/en/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8990. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)
    Source: World Health Organization (WHO)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) is a 10-item questionnaire that screens for hazardous or harmful alcohol consumption and identifies mild dependence. Developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), the test correctly classifies 95 percent of people into either alcoholics or non-alcoholics. The AUDIT is particularly suitable for use in primary care settings and has been used with a variety of populations and cultural groups. It should be administered by a health professional or paraprofessional. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 8.9
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 10 questions
    Time to Complete: 2-4 Minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Spanish, Slavic, Chinese, Catalan, Dutch, French, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Slovenian, Swedish, Polish, Norwegian, Swahili, and Romanian
    These translations are available by writing to the Programme on Substance Abuse, World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland; some translations may also be found at: http://www.alcohollearningcentre.org.uk/Topics/Browse/BriefAdvice/?parent=4444&child=6148
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    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    MacFarlane AC, Van Hoff M. Impact of childhood exposure to a natural disaster on adult mental health: 20-year longitudinal follow-up study. Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Aug;195(2):142-8. PubMed PMID: 19648546. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19648546. Subscription not required.

    Saunders JB, Aasland OG, Babor TF, de la Fuente JR, Grant M. Development of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT): WHO Collaborative Project on Early Detection of Persons with Harmful Alcohol Consumption--II. Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-804. PubMed PMID: 8329970. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8329970. Subscription required.

    Bohn MJ, Babor TF, Kranzler HR. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT): validation of a screening instrument for use in medical settings. J Stud Alcohol. 1995 Jul;56(4):423-32. PubMed PMID: 7674678. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7674678. Subscription required.

    Schmidt A, Barry KL, Fleming MF. Detection of problem drinkers: the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). South Med J. 1995 Jan;88(1):52-9. PubMed PMID: 7817228. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7817228. Subscription required.

    Conigrave KM, Hall WD, Saunders JB. The AUDIT questionnaire: choosing a cut-off score. Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Addiction. 1995 Oct;90(10):1349-56. PubMed PMID: 8616463. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8616463. Subscription required.

    Available Formats: Electronic

    For more information:

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration/ Department of Health and Human Services
    http://www.integration.samhsa.gov/clinical-practice/screening-tools

    World Health Organization, Department of Mental Health and Substance Dependence
    http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/67205/1/WHO_MSD_MSB_01.6a.pdf

    Public Health England (PHE)
    http://www.alcohollearningcentre.org.uk/Topics/Browse/BriefAdvice/?parent=4444&child=4896
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8991. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  7. CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL)
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) is a measure of an individual's or group's perceived physical or mental health over time. The CDC HRQOL measures include self-rated health and number of physically unhealthy days, mentally unhealthy days, and activity limitation days. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 9.9
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 14 total questions, three modules
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Spanish
    Spanish translation can be found at: https://www.cdc.gov/hrqol/spanish.htm
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    McKibben JB, Fullerton CS, Ursano RJ, Reissman DB, Kowalski-Trakofler K, Shultz JM, Wang L. Sleep and arousal as risk factors for adverse health and work performance in public health workers involved in the 2004 Florida hurricane season. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2010 Sep;4 Suppl 1:S55-62. PubMed PMID: 23105036. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23105036. Subscription required.

    Hennessy CH, Moriarty DG, Zack MM, Scherr PA, Brackbill R. Measuring health-related quality of life for public health surveillance. Public Health Rep. 1994 Sep-Oct;109(5):665-72. PubMed PMID: 7938388; PubMed Central PMCID:PMC1403555. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7938388. Subscription not required.

    Moriarty DG, Zack MM, Kobau R. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Healthy Days Measures - population tracking of perceived physical and mental health over time. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2003 Sep 2;1:37. PubMed PMID: 14498988; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC201011. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14498988. Subscription not required.

    Zullig KJ, Valois RF, Huebner ES, Drane JW. Evaluating the performance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention core Health-Related Quality of Life scale with adolescents. Public Health Rep. 2004 Nov-Dec;119(6):577-84. PubMed PMID: 15504449; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1497669. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15504449. Subscription not required.

    Mielenz T, Jackson E, Currey S, DeVellis R, Callahan LF. Psychometric properties of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health-Related Quality of Life (CDC HRQOL) items in adults with arthritis. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006 Sep 24;4:66. PubMed PMID: 16995955; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1609101. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16995955. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Related Quality of Life Surveillance Program
    Address: 1600 Clifton Rd., Atlanta, GA 30333
    Phone: 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)/TTY: (888) 232-6348
    Web site: https://www.cdc.gov/

    For more information:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    https://www.cdc.gov/hrqol/methods.htm

    To preview this tool:
    California Mental Health Services Authority
    http://calmhsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/CDC-HRQOL-14.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8992. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  8. Drinking Motives Questionnaire Revised (DMQ-R)
    Source: University of Missouri (MU)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Drinking Motives Questionnaire Revised (DMQ-R) consists of 10 questions about the respondent's coping and enhancement motives (reasons) for drinking alcohol. The respondent is asked to respond to each question via a five-item scale ranging from 1 for "almost never/never" to 5 for "almost always/always." This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 15 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Hungarian, Turkish, German, French, and Swedish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Stewart SH, Mitchell TL, Wright KD, Loba P. The relations of PTSD symptoms to alcohol use and coping drinking in volunteers who responded to the Swissair Flight 111 airline disaster. J Anxiety Disord. 2004;18(1):51-68. PubMed PMID: 14725868. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14725868. Subscription required.

    Stewart SH, Zeitlin SB, Samoluk SB. Examination of a three-dimensional drinking motives questionnaire in a young adult university student sample. Behav Res Ther. 1996 Jan;34(1):61-71. PubMed PMID: 8561766. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8561766. Subscription required.

    Gire JT. A cross-national study of motives for drinking alcohol. Subst Use Misuse. 2002 Jan;37(2):215-23. PubMed PMID: 11863276. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11863276. Subscription required.

    Kuntsche E, Stewart SH, Cooper ML. How stable is the motive-alcohol use link? A cross-national validation of the Drinking Motives Questionnaire Revised among adolescents from Switzerland, Canada, and the United States. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2008 May;69(3):388-96. PubMed PMID: 18432381. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18432381. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dr. M. Lynne Cooper
    Institution: University of Missouri-Columbia, Department of Psychological Sciences
    Address: 105 McAlester Hall
    Columbia, MO 65211
    Phone: (573) 882-2365
    Fax: (573) 882-7710
    Email: cooperm@missouri.edu

    To preview the original 15-item DMQ:
    Institution: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Psychology
    Web: http://dionysus.psych.wisc.edu/MediaWiki/index.php?title=Drinking_Motive_Questionnaires_(DMQ)&oldid=2275
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8993. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  9. Family APGAR (Adaptability, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve) Index
    Source: Loyola University Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine (SSOM)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Family Adaptability, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve (APGAR) index tool is widely used to study the relationship between family function and health problems in family practice offices. This measure consists of five parameters of family functioning: Adaptability, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve. The response options were designed to describe frequency of feeling satisfied with each parameter on a 3-point scale ranging from 0 (hardly ever) to 2 (almost always). This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 6
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: Five questions
    Time to Complete: Five minutes or less
    Administered by: Lay interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Chinese, Filipino, Spanish, and Portuguese
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    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Cao X, Jiang X, Li X, Jenny Lo M, Li R. Family functioning and its predictors among disaster bereaved individuals in China: eighteen months after the Wenchaun Earthquake. PLoS One. 2013 Apr;8(4): e60738. Epub 2013 Apr 3. PubMed PMID: 23573280. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23573280. Subscription not required.

    Smilkstein G. The family APGAR: a proposal for a family function test and its use by physicians. J Fam Pract. 1978 Jun;6(6):1231-9. PubMed PMID: 660126. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/660126. Subscription required.

    Mengel MB. The Family APGAR in a research setting. Fam Med. 1988 Mar-Apr;20(2):96, 98, 144. PubMed PMID: 3360238. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3360238. Subscription required.

    Gardner W, Nutting PA, Kelleher KJ, Werner JJ, Farley T, Stewart L, Hartsell M, Orzano AJ. Does the family APGAR effectively measure family functioning? J Fam Pract. 2001 Jan;50(1):19-25. PubMed PMID: 11195476. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11195476. Subscription required.

    The measure can be also be found within the following original article publication. See citation: Smilkstein G. The family APGAR: a proposal for a family function test and its use by physicians. J Fam Pract. 1978 Jun;6(6):1231-9. PubMed PMID: 660126. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/660126. Subscription required.
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8995. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  10. McMaster Family Assessment Device (MFAD)
    Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The McMaster Family Assessment Device (MFAD), based on the McMaster Model of Family Functioning (MMFF), describes the structural and organizational properties of the family group and the patterns of transactions among family members. This tool is a 60-item self-report instrument with items phrased to denote both effective (e.g., "We feel accepted for what we are.") and problematic family functioning (e.g., "We don't get along well together."). Respondents rate how well each statement describes their family; response options include strongly agree, agree, disagree, and strongly disagree. Items are reverse scored as needed, with higher scores indicating poorer family functioning. In addition to a General Functioning Index, the MFAD generates scores on six dimensions (problem solving, communication, roles, affective responsiveness, affective involvement, and behavioral control). This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 7.1
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: Latest version contains 60 questions and seven scales; however, the original scale contained only 53 items.
    Time to Complete: 15-20 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Chinese, Arabic, Armenian, Japanese, Thai, Turkish, and Hungarian
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    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Byles J, Byrne C, Boyle MH, Offord DR. Ontario Child Health Study: reliability and validity of the general functioning subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device. Fam Process. 1988 Mar;27(1):97-104. PubMed PMID: 3360100. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3360100. Subscription required.

    Stevenson-Hinde J, Akister J. The McMaster Model of Family Functioning: observer and parental ratings in a nonclinical sample. Fam Process. 1995 Sep;34(3):337-47. PubMed PMID: 8582479. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8582479. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: McMaster University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences
    Address: St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton West 5th Campus Administration - B3, 100 West 5th, Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7 Canada
    Phone: +1 905-522-1155 ext. 36291
    Fax: +1 905-575-6085
    Web: http://www.psychiatryneuroscience.com

    Scale can be obtained from:
    Institution: Brown University, Butler Hospital
    Address: Butler Hospital Family Research Program, 345 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, RI 02906

    For additional information:
    Institution: UCLA Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services
    Web: http://chipts.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2012/02/McMaster-FAD-Subscales.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8996. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  11. Loss of Resources (LOR) Scale
    Source: Tulane University
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Loss of Resources (LOR) measure is a list of tangible and nontangible psychosocial, financial, and personal characteristics and conditions. Participants indicate the degree to which they have experienced each loss on a scale of 0-4 (0=no loss, 4=extreme amount of loss). See Table 1 in Erlich et al. for the list of scorable factors. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Population: Adults only
    Length: 40 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Ehrlich M, Harville E, Xiong X, Beukens P, Pridjian G, Elkind-Hirsch K. Loss of resources and hurricane experience as predictors of postpartum depression among women in southern Louisiana. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 May;19(5):877-84. PubMed PMID: 20438305. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20438305. Subscription not required.

    Ehrlich M, Harville E, Xiong X, Buekens P, Pridjian G, Elkind-Hirsch K. Loss of resources and hurricane experience as predictors of postpartum depression among women in southern Louisiana. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 May;19(5):877-84. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2009.1693. PubMed PMID: 20438305; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2875990. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20438305. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Contact Person: Dr. Emily Harville, Ph.D.
    Institution: Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Department of Epidemiology
    Address: 1440 Canal Street, Suite 2000, New Orleans, LA 70112
    E-mail: Harville@Tulane.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8998. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  12. Perceptions AbouT Hazardous Substances (PATHS)
    Source: King's College of London
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Perceptions AbouT Hazardous Substances (PATHS) questionnaire provides reliable, valid measures of the perceptions people hold about the properties of non-contagious hazardous substances. The questionnaire can be found in the Appendix of Rubin et al, 2013. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.1
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 56 questions; nine domains
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
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    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Environmental Exposure(s)
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Rubin GJ, Amlí´t R, Wessely S, Greenberg N. Anxiety, distress and anger among British nationals in Japan following the Fukushima nuclear accident. Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;201(5):400-7. Epub 2012 Sep 20. PubMed PMID: 22995630. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22995630. Subscription not required.

    Rubin GJ, Amlí´t R, Wessely S, Greenberg N. Anxiety, distress and anger among British nationals in Japan following the Fukushima nuclear accident. Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;201(5):400-7. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.112.111575. Epub 2012 Sep 20. PubMed PMID: 22995630. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22995630. Subscription not required.

    Rubin GJ, Amlí´t R, Page L, Pearce J, Wessely S. Assessing perceptions about hazardous substances (PATHS): the PATHS questionnaire. J Health Psychol. 2013 Aug;18(8):1100-13. doi: 10.1177/1359105312459096. Epub 2012 Oct 26. PubMed PMID: 23104995; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3785320. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23104995. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Gideon James Rubin
    Institution: King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine
    Address: Weston Education Centre (PO62), Room 3.26, 3rd Floor, Cutcombe Road, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RJ, UK
    Phone: +44 (0)20 7848 5684
    Email: Gideon.rubin@kcl.ac.uk

    For more information:
    Institution: King's College London, UK
    Web: https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/assessing-perceptions-about-hazardous-substances(e025972e-2639-409a-accc-4140b7e6ddd8).html
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9000. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  13. Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS)
    Source: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) is a measure of global cognitive judgments of one's life satisfaction (not a measure of either positive or negative affect). To complete the scale, participants indicate how much they agree or disagree with each of the five items using a seven-point scale that ranges from 7 (strongly agree) to 1 (strongly disagree). This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 6.3
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: Five questions
    Time to Complete: 1-5 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Portuguese, Persian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Setswana, Spanish, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Arabic, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindu, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Japanese, Khmer, Korean and Norwegian

    To obtain translations of this tool, visit: http://internal.psychology.illinois.edu/~ediener/SWLS.html
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Bei B, Bryant C, Gilson KM, Koh J, Gibson P, Komiti A, Jackson A, Judd F. A prospective study of the impact of floods on the mental and physical health of older adults. Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(8):992-1002. Epub 2013 May 28. PubMed PMID: 23711204. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23711204. Subscription Required.

    Diener E, Emmons RA, Larsen RJ, Griffin S. The Satisfaction With Life Scale. J Pers Assess. 1985 Feb;49(1):71-5. PubMed PMID: 16367493. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16367493. Subscription required.

    Pavot W, Diener E, Colvin CR, Sandvik E. Further validation of the Satisfaction with Life Scale: evidence for the cross-method convergence of well-being measures. J Pers Assess. 1991 Aug;57(1):149-61. PubMed PMID: 1920028. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1920028. Subscription required.

    Corrigan JD, Kolakowsky-Hayner S, Wright J, Bellon K, Carufel P. The satisfaction with life scale. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2013 Nov-Dec;28(6):489-91. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000004. PubMed PMID: 24189288. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24189288. Subscription required.

    The scale is copyrighted but it is free for use without permission or charge by all professionals (researchers and practitioners) as long as proper credit is given to the authors of the scale: Ed Diener, Robert A. Emmons, Randy J. Larsen, and Sharon Griffin, as noted in the 1985 article in the Journal of Personality Assessment.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Professor Ed Diener
    Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Psychology
    Address: 603 E. Daniel Street, Champaign, IL 61820
    Phone: 217-333-4804
    Fax: 217-244-5876
    Email: ediener@illinois.edu

    For more information:
    Institution: Fetzer Institute
    Web: http://www.fetzer.org/sites/default/files/images/stories/pdf/selfmeasures/SATISFACTION-SatisfactionWithLife.pdf

    Institution: University of Pennsylvania, Positive Psychology Center
    Web: http://ppc.sas.upenn.edu/resources/questionnaires-researchers/satisfaction-life-scale

    Institution: Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Sciences (MIDSS)
    Web: http://www.midss.org/content/satisfaction-life-scale-swl
    +P21
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9002. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  14. Social Provisions Scale (SPS)
    Source: Iowa State University
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Social Provisions Scale was developed to assess the provisions of social relationships. These provisions reflect what people receive from relationships with other people. The six provisions are guidance (advice or information), reliable alliance (assurance that others can be counted on in times of stress), reassurance of worth (recognition of one's competence), attachment (emotional closeness), social integration (a sense of belonging to a group of friends), and opportunity for nurturance (providing assistance to others). The goal of this measure is to examine the degree to which a respondent's social relationships provide various dimensions of social support. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.4
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 24 questions
    Time to Complete: 5 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, French, and Urdu
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    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Chan CS, Rhodes JE. Religious coping, posttraumatic stress, psychological distress, and posttraumatic growth among female survivors four years after Hurricane Katrina. J Trauma Stress. 2013 Apr;26(2):257-65. Epub 2013 Mar 25. PubMed PMID: 23529889. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23529889. Subscription required.

    Russell D, Cutrona CE, Rose J, Yurko K. Social and emotional loneliness: an examination of Weiss's typology of loneliness. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1984 Jun;46(6):1313-21. PubMed PMID: 6737214. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6737214. Subscription required.

    Cutrona CE. Social support and stress in the transition to parenthood. J Abnorm Psychol. 1984 Nov;93(4):378-90. PubMed PMID: 6512084. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6512084. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: David R. Russell, Professor of English
    Address: Iowa State University, 2300 Palmer Building, Ames, Iowa 50011
    Phone: 515-294-4724
    Fax: 515-294-6814
    Email: drrussel@iastate.edu

    For more information:
    Institution: National Cancer Institute, U.S National Institutes of Health
    Web: http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/brp/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9004. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  15. Subjective Happiness Scale
    Source: University of California, Riverside (UCR)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) is a four-item scale of global subjective happiness. Each item is completed by choosing one of seven options that finish a given sentence fragment. The options are different for each of the four questions. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 5.7
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: Four questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Welsh, Urdu, Spanish, French, Arabic, Greek, Tagalog, Malay, Japanese, Chinese, Turkish, German, and Russian
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Vera-Villarroel P, Zych I, Celis-Atenas K, Córdova-Rubio N,Buela-Casal G. Chilean validation of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C) after the earthquake on February 27, 2010. Psychol Rep. 2011 Aug;109(1):47-58. PubMed PMID: 22049647. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22049647. Subscription required.

    Lyubomirsky S, Ross L. Hedonic consequences of social comparison: a contrast of happy and unhappy people. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1997 Dec;73(6):1141-57. PubMed PMID: 9418274. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9418274. Subscription required.

    Lyubomirsky S, Ross L. Changes in attractiveness of elected, rejected, and precluded alternatives: a comparison of happy and unhappy individuals. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1999 Jun;76(6):988-1007. PubMed PMID: 10402682. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10402682. Subscription required.

    Lyubomirsky S, Lepper HS. A measure of subjective happiness: Preliminary reliability and construct validation. Soc Indic Res. 1999;46(2):137-155. http://my.psychologytoday.com/files/attachments/496/subjective-happiness-scale.pdf. Subscription not required.

    Permission is granted for all non-commercial use. Please cite the following scale validation paper in all work mentioning the scale:
    Lyubomirsky S, Lepper H. A measure of subjective happiness: Preliminary reliability and construct validation. Soc Indic Res. 1999;46:137-155. The original publication of the aforementioned citation is available at http://www.springerlink.com.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky
    Institution: University of California, Riverside, Department of Psychology
    Address: Riverside, CA 92521
    Phone: 951-827-5041
    Fax: 951-827-3985
    Email: sonja.lyubomirsky@ucr.edu
    Web: http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/; http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/subjective-happiness-scale-shs/

    For more information:
    Institution: University of Pennsylvania, Positive Psychology Center
    Web: http://ppc.sas.upenn.edu/resources/questionnaires-researchers/subjective-happiness-scale

    Institution: Fetzer Institute
    Web: http://www.fetzer.org/sites/default/files/images/stories/pdf/selfmeasures/SATISFACTION-SubjectiveHappiness.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9005. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  16. Social Support Scale for Children
    Source: University of Denver (DU)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: This commercially available instrument consists of three competence domains: Cognitive, Social, and Physical, as well as a subscale measuring general feelings of self-worth. It is a 28-item scale designed for children over age eight and has also been adapted specifically for adolescents. The Social Support Scale portion of this instrument was designed to examine perceived support and global self-worth based on the perceived regard from others. Within the social support scale, there are four subscales: Parent, teacher, close friend, and classmate-based support. Each scale examines the extent to which a child is understood; listened to; has someone to talk to about matters that concern him/her or to help address challenges and problems; and the degree to which children are treated fairly and appreciated for who they are on a fundamental level. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 8.4
    Population: Children/Teens only
    Length: The overall competence measure contains seven items for each of the four scales, for a total of 28 questions. However, a more recently revised version (dated 2012) of the social support portion of the questionnaire states that there are 24 total questions for this particular section, with each subscale containing six items.
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Spanish, Dutch, and Finnish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    La Greca AM, Lai BS, Joormann J, Auslander BB, Short MA. Children's risk and resilience following a natural disaster: genetic vulnerability, posttraumatic stress, and depression. J Affect Disord. 2013 Dec;151(3):860-7. Epub 2013 Aug 16. PubMed PMID: 24035489. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24035489. Subscription required.

    Harter, S. Manual for the Social Support Scale for Children. Denver, CO: University of Denver, 1985. https://portfolio.du.edu/downloadItem/224451. Subscription not required.

    Wichstrí¸m L. Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: reliability, validity, and evaluation of the question format. J Pers Assess. 1995 Aug;65(1):100-16. PubMed PMID: 7643294. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7643294. Subscription required.

    Van den Bergh BR, Van Ranst N. Self-concept in children: equivalence of measurement and structure across gender and grade of Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children. J Pers Assess. 1998 Jun;70(3):564-82. PubMed PMID: 9760744. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9760744. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Susan Harter
    Institution: University of Denver
    Address: University Park, Denver, CO 80208
    Phone: 303-871-2000
    Email: sharter@du.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 9006. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  17. Disaster Response and Recovery Needs of Communities Affected by the Elk River Chemical Spill, West Virginia: Appendix A: West Virginia CASPER Questionnaire-April 2014
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The questionnaire is located in Appendix A on page 65. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 33 multi-part questions
    Special Considerations: Interview/Questionnaire was conducted at participant's home.
    Administered by: Trained Lay Examiner/Interviewer Administered
    Language(s): English
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    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11090. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  18. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) after the Gulf Coast Oil Spill. Alabama, 2010: Appendix A. Gulf Coast Oil Spill CASPER Questionnaire
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: CASPER (Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response), published 9/3/2010, is an epidemiologic technique designed to provide household-based information about an affected community's needs after a disaster quickly and at low cost. The survey instrument includes questions regarding respiratory, cardiovascular, dermatologic, and other physical symptoms and signs that occurred or worsened in the previous 30 days; standardized questions on quality of life, mental health, and social context; as well as individual and household level exposure questions related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 32 questions
    Administered by: Trained Lay Interviewer/Interviewer Administered
    Language(s): English
    Special Considerations: Interview/Questionnaire was conducted at participant's home.
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Questionnaire is located in Appendix A.

    Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Buttke D, Vagi S, Bayleyegn T, Sircar K, Strine T, Morrison M, Allen M, Wolkin A. Mental health needs assessment after the Gulf Coast oil spill-Alabama and Mississippi, 2010. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Oct;27(5):401-8. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X12001100. Epub 2012 Aug 21. PubMed PMID: 22985680.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22985680. Subscription required.

    Buttke D, Vagi S, Schnall A, Bayleyegn T, Morrison M, Allen M, Wolkin A. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) one year following the Gulf Coast oil spill: Alabama and Mississippi, 2011. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Dec;27(6):496-502. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X12001380. Epub 2012
    Sep 25. PubMed PMID: 23010443.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23010443. Subscription required.

    Contact information:
    Contact person: Amy Wolkin
    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Phone: 770-488-3402
    Email: ajf9@cdc.gov

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Studies Branch
    Phone: 770-488-3403
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11091. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  19. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [ICPSR]
    Source: University of Michigan
    Format: Text
    Annotation: ICPSR seeks research data and pertinent documents from researchers, including PIs, research agencies, and government entities. We process, preserve, and disseminate the data and documents. We also provide education, training, and instructional resources to help users understand and analyze research data. Approximately 760 universities, government agencies, and other institutions are members of ICPSR. Faculty, staff, and students of member institutions have full direct access to the data archive and to all of ICPSR's services. Everyone affiliated with a member institution receives full access to the data archive of more than 8,000 research studies. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: All/Anyone
    Language(s): English
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    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Database/Dataset
    Access Notes: Site requires free registration. Permission/Request required

    Phone: (734)647-2200
    Email: help@icpsr.umich.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12947. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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