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The Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health.

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Displaying records 281 - 300 of 347

of 18
  1. Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS): Version IV
    Source: University of Florida (UF)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) allows trained lay interviewers or clinicians to make psychiatric diagnoses according to DSM-III (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd Edition) criteria, Feighner criteria, and Research Diagnostic Criteria. The "Feighner criteria" and "Research Diagnostic Criteria" are standardized diagnostic criteria for various mental health/psychiatric disorders, developed and published between the 1950s-1970s. It is being used in a set of epidemiological studies sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health Center for Epidemiological Studies. The accuracy of DIS has been evaluated in a test-retest design comparing independent administrations by psychiatrists and lay interviewers. It is also called C DIS or Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 19 modules-526 total items; number of questions administered is based on symptoms/answer choices endorsed
    Time to Complete: 75-150 minutes
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Special Considerations: Interviewers must first complete a three- or five-day (didactic or practical) training program and a week of field practice. Interviewers should have at least a high school diploma. Two computer programs are available, as well as a hand-scoring manual.
    Language(s): English, Spanish, French, Chinese, German, sign language, and Vietnamese
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Proprietary - Cost/Purchase required

    Citation(s):
    Tucker PM, Pfefferbaum B, North CS, Kent A, Burgin CE, Parker DE, Hossain A, Jeon-Slaughter H, Trautman RP. Physiologic reactivity despite emotional resilience several years after direct exposure to terrorism. Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Feb;164(2):230-5. PubMed PMID: 17267785. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17267785. Subscription required.

    Robins LN, Helzer JE, Croughan J, Ratcliff KS. National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Its history, characteristics, and validity. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;38(4):381-9. PubMed PMID: 6260053. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6260053. Subscription required.

    Helzer JE, Robins LN. The diagnostic interview schedule: its development, evolution, and use. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1988 Jan;23(1):6-16. PubMed PMID: 3130671. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3130671. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Materials are copyrighted and there is a fee for computer programs and related materials. For more information and to purchase:

    University of Florida
    http://epidemiology.phhp.ufl.edu/assessments/c-dis-iv/

    For more information about the paper/pencil version:
    Contact person: Judy Kulterman or Susan Keating
    Institution: Department of Psychiatry
    Washington University School of Medicine
    Address: 4940 Audubon Ave.
    St. Louis, MO 63110

    For information about the computer version:
    Contact person: Dr. J.H. Greist
    Institution: Department of Psychiatry
    University of Washington
    Address: 600 Highland Ave.
    Madison, WI 53792

    Additional contact person: Dr. Linda B. Cottler
    Institution: C DIS-IV Sales and Training
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Florida
    Address: 2004 Mowry Road
    P.O. Box 100231
    Gainesville, FL 32610 USA
    Fax: 352-273-5365
    Email at: lbcottler@ufl.edu
    Phone: 352-273-5468
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8171. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  2. Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I. or MINI)
    Source: University of South Florida (USF)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I. or MINI) is a short structured diagnostic interview, developed jointly by psychiatrists and clinicians in the United States and Europe, for DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition) and ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th rev.) psychiatric disorders. With an administration time of approximately 15 minutes, it was designed to meet the need for a short but accurate structured psychiatric interview for multi-center clinical trials and epidemiology studies, and to be used as a first step in outcome tracking in non-research clinical settings. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 7.2
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 120-130 questions (questions administered are dependent upon symptom questions and answers endorsed by interviewee, and answers to MINI screen dictate which modules will be administered)
    Time to Complete: 15-20 minutes
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Japanese, Arabic, Norwegian, Thai, Afrikaans, Basque, Bengali, Brazilian, Portuguese, Bulgarian, Catalan, Czech, Chinese, Croatian, Cantonese, Danish, Dutch, Flemish, Farsi, Persian, German, Gujarati, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Norwegian, Polish, Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Malay, Serbian, Setswana, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, Urdu, Tagalog, Telugu, and Welsh
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Proprietary - Cost/Purchase required

    Citation(s):
    Suzuki Y, Tsutsumi A, Fukasawa M, Honma H, Someya T, Kim Y. Prevalence of mental disorders and suicidal thoughts among community-dwelling elderly adults 3 years after the niigata-chuetsu earthquake. J Epidemiol. 2011;21(2):144-50. Epub 2011 Feb 12. PubMed PMID:21325733. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21325733. Subscription not required.

    Lecrubier Y, Sheehan DV, Weiller E, Amorim P, Bonora I, Sheehan KH, Janavs J, and Dunbar, GC. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). A short diagnostic structured interview: reliability and validity according to the CIDI. Eur Psychiatry. 1997;12(5):224-31. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924933897832968. Subscription required.

    Sheehan, DV, Lecrubier Y, Sheehan KH, Janavs J, Weiller E, Keskiner A, Schinka J, Knapp E, Sheehan MF, and Dunbar GC. The validity of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) according to the SCID-P and its reliability. Eur Psychiatry 1997;12(5):232-41. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092493389783297X. Subscription required.

    Sheehan DV, Lecrubier Y, Sheehan KH, Amorim P, Janavs J, Weiller E, Hergueta T, Baker R, Dunbar GC. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.): the development and validation of a structured diagnostic psychiatric interview for DSM-IV and ICD-10. J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:22-33;quiz 34-57. Review. PubMed PMID: 9881538. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9881538. Subscription required.

    Available Formats: Computerized version

    Contact information:

    Contact person: David Sheehan, M.D., M.B.A.
    Institution: University of South Florida
    Institute for Research in Psychiatry
    Address: 3515 East Fletcher Avenue
    Tampa, FL 33613-4788
    Phone: 813-974-4544
    Fax: 813-974-4575
    Email: dsheehan@com1.med.usf.edu

    To purchase:
    Institution: Medical Outcome Systems, Inc.
    Address: 12627 San Jose Blvd., Suite 206
    Jacksonville, FL 32223
    Phone: 866-463-6464
    Fax: 800-886-3585
    Web: http://www.medical-outcomes.com/index/contact
    Web: http://www.medical-outcomes.com/index/miniforstudentsclinicians
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8172. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  3. PCL (PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder] Checklist): Civilian Version (PCL-C); Military Version (PCL-M); Stressor Specific Version (PCL-S)
    Source: National Center for PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder] [U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs]
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The PCL (PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder] Checklist) is a 17-item self-report measure of the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition) symptoms of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). The PCL has a variety of clinical and research purposes, such as screening individuals for PTSD, aiding in the diagnostic assessment of PTSD, and monitoring change in PTSD symptoms. There are three versions of this measure: the civilian version (PCL-C), military version (PCL-M), and stressor specific version (PCL-S).

    The PCL-C asks about symptoms in relation to generic "stressful experiences" and can be used with any population. This version simplifies assessment based on multiple traumas because symptom endorsements are not attributed to a specific event. In many circumstances, it is also advisable to assess traumatic event exposure to ensure that a respondent has experienced at least one event that meets DSM-IV Criterion A.

    The PCL-M asks about symptoms in response to "stressful military experiences." It is often used with active service members and veterans.

    The PCL-S asks about symptoms in relation to an identified "stressful experience."

    The PCL-5 was developed to assess the 20 DSM-V (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition) symptoms of PTSD. Several revisions were made to update the PCL for the DSM-V. There is not a corresponding civilian or military version for the PCL-5, and the scale was changed from 1-5 to 0-4. The increase in the number of questions and the change in the scale mean that the PCL-5 scores are not compatible with PCL scores, and the two cannot be used interchangeably. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade PCL-M = 8.5
    PCL-C = 7.2
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 17 questions
    Time to Complete: 5-10 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Bosnian, Chinese, Greek, and Spanish
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    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Brackbill RM, Hadler JL, DiGrande L, Ekenga CC, Farfel MR, Friedman S, Perlman SE, Stellman SD, Walker DJ, Wu D, Yu S, Thorpe LE. Asthma and posttraumatic stress symptoms 5 to 6 years following exposure to the World Trade Center terrorist attack. JAMA. 2009 Aug 5;302(5):502-16. PubMed PMID: 19654385. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19654385. Subscription not required.

    Blanchard EB, Jones-Alexander J, Buckley TC, Forneris CA. Psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist (PCL). Behav Res Ther. 1996 Aug;34(8):669-73. PubMed PMID: 8870294. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8870294. Subscription required.

    Forbes D, Creamer M, Biddle D. The validity of the PTSD checklist as a measure of symptomatic change in combat-related PTSD. Behav Res Ther. 2001 Aug;39(8):977-86. PubMed PMID: 11480838. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11480838. Subscription required.

    Wilkins KC, Lang AJ, Norman SB. Synthesis of the psychometric properties of the PTSD checklist (PCL) military, civilian, and specific versions. Depress Anxiety. 2011 Jul;28(7):596-606. doi: 10.1002/da.20837. Epub 2011 Jun 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 21681864; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3128669. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21681864. Subscription not required.

    Although these measures are available in the public domain, they were created by staff at the Veterans Affairs (VA) National Center for PTSD (this includes the PCL-5, mentioned in greater detail later in the annotation) and require permission for use. The VA states that information on measures is available to everyone; however, the assessment tools themselves can be distributed only to qualified mental health professionals and researchers.

    Contact information:

    For more information on how to obtain and rightfully use this tool or to complete a request form to receive this tool:
    Institution: Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD
    Web: http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/assessment/adult-sr/ptsd-checklist.asp
    http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/assessment/ncptsd-instrument-request-form.asp

    To preview the PCL/PCL-C/PCL-M/PCL-S:
    Institution: Australian Centre for Post-Traumatic Mental Health
    Web: http://at-ease.dva.gov.au/professionals/files/2012/12/PCL.pdf

    Institution: North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
    Web: http://www.ncdhhs.gov/mhddsas/providers/DWI/dualdiagnosis/PCL%20%28PTSD%29.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8173. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  4. Primary Care PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) Screen (PC-PTSD)
    Source: National Center for PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder] [U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs]
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Primary Care PTSD Screen (PC-PTSD) is a four-item screening tool that was designed for use in primary care and other medical settings, and is currently used to screen for PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) in veterans at the Veterans Administration. The screen includes an introductory sentence to cue respondents to traumatic events. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 7.4
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: Four questions
    Time to Complete: Not specified/given
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes:
    Download document as adapted for the NIH Disaster Research Response Program:


    Epi InfoEpi Info Instructions

    Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Mills LD, Mills TJ, Macht M, Levitan R, De Wulf A, Afonso NS. Posttraumatic stress disorder in an emergency department population one year after Hurricane Katrina. J Emerg Med. 2012 Jul;43(1):76-82. Epub 2012 Feb 23. PubMed PMID: 22365529. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22365529. Subscription required.

    Prins A, Ouimette P, Kimerling R, Camerond RP, Hugelshofer DS, Shaw-Hegwer J, Thrailkill A, Gusman FD, Sheikh JI. The primary care PTSD screen (PC-PTSD): development and operating characteristics. Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2004;9(1):9-14. http://www.ptsd.va.gov/PTSD/professional/articles/article-pdf/id26676.pdf. Subscription not required.

    Bliese PD, Wright KM, Adler AB, Cabrera O, Castro CA, Hoge CW. Validating the primary care posttraumatic stress disorder screen and the posttraumatic stress disorder checklist with soldiers returning from combat. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2008 Apr;76(2):272-81. doi: 10.1037/0022-006X.76.2.272. PubMed PMID: 18377123. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18377123. Subscription required.

    For additional links to this tool:
    Institution: University of Vermont, College of Medicine
    Web: http://www.uvm.edu/medicine/ahec/documents/Primary_Care_PTSD_Screen_PC-PTSD.pdf

    Institution: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Web: http://www.integration.samhsa.gov/clinical-practice/pc-ptsd.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8175. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  5. Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)
    Source: Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) is an internationally recognized personality test developed by Dr. C. Robert Cloninger. The TCI assesses different traits of human personality by examining an individual's unique configuration of emotions and higher cognitive processes. There is a 140-item version and a 240-item version. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 140 or 240 questions, depending on version
    Time to Complete: 30-45 minutes
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English, Swedish, Japanese, Dutch, German, Polish, Korean, Finnish, Chinese, Spanish, Czech, Italian, and French
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Proprietary - Cost/Purchase required

    Citation(s):
    North CS, Tivis L, McMillen JC, Pfefferbaum B, Cox J, Spitznagel EL, Bunch K, Schorr J, Smith EM. Coping, functioning, and adjustment of rescue workers after the Oklahoma City bombing. J Trauma Stress. 2002 Jun;15(3):171-5. PubMed PMID: 12092908. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12092908. Subscription required.

    Cloninger CR. A systematic method for clinical description and classification of personality variants. A proposal. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987 Jun;44(6):573-88. PubMed PMID: 3579504. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3579504. Subscription required.

    Cloninger CR, Svrakic DM, Przybeck TR. A psychobiological model of temperament and character. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1993 Dec;50(12):975-90. Review. PubMed PMID: 8250684. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8250684. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    To purchase:
    Institution: Anthropedia Foundation
    Web: http://www.anthropediafoundation.org/site/PageServer?pagename=wwd_tci

    Contact person: C. Robert Cloninger, M.D.
    Institution: Center for Well-Being
    Washington University
    Address: P.O. Box 505153
    St. Louis, MO 63150-5143
    Phone: 314-362-7005
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8176. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. Short Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Rating Interview
    Source: National Center for PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder] [U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs]
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The Short Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Rating Interview (SPRINT) is an eight-question post-disaster assessment and referral tool. The SPRINT has been determined to have good reliability and convergent validity with other PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) diagnostic and psychological functioning measures in both clinical trials and population surveys. The SPRINT-E contains 12 questions: the eight questions in the SPRINT, as well as three additional questions regarding depression and impaired functioning, and one additional question regarding suicide. There is also a 10-item clinician-administered version that examines the participant's or patient's response to a treatment or intervention. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: Grade 10.1
    Population: Adults only
    Length: 8-12 items depending on version
    Time to Complete: 5-10 minutes
    Administered by: Self Report/Self Administered, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Special Considerations: It has been noted in various publications that this tool should be administered by a clinician or mental health professional who can interpret the scores from this measure and use it to guide treatment decisions and make more conclusive diagnoses. However, other sources state that this tool can be completed via self report/self administration with clinical and referral decisions being made by qualified professionals.
    Language(s): English, Spanish, Creole, and Korean
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Connor KM, Davidson JR. SPRINT: a brief global assessment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2001 Sep;16(5):279-84. PubMed PMID: 11552771. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11552771. Subscription required.

    Norris FH, Hamblen JL, Brown LM, Schinka JA. Validation of the Short Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Rating Interview (expanded version, Sprint-E) as a measure of postdisaster distress and treatment need. Am J Disaster Med. 2008 Jul-Aug;3(4):201-12. PubMed PMID: 18822839. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18822839. Subscription required.

    Kim TS, Chung MY, Kim W, Koo YJ, Ryu SG, Kim EJ, Woo JM, Kim TH, Yang JC, Choi KS, Pae CU, Seo HJ, Lim HK, Chae JH; Disaster Psychiatry Committee in Korean Academy of Anxiety Disorders. Psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Short Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Rating Interview (K-SPRINT). Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Feb;62(1):34-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1819.2007.01774.x. PubMed PMID: 18289139. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1440-1819.2007.01774.x/pdf. Subscription not required. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18289139. Subscription required.

    Leiva-Bianchi MC, Araneda AC. Validation of the Davidson Trauma Scale in its original and a new shorter version in people exposed to the F-27 earthquake in Chile. Eur J Psychotraumatol. 2013;4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23983920. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Jonathan R. T. Davidson, MD
    Institution: Duke University Medical Center
    Address: Durham, North Carolina 27710
    Phone: 919-684-2880
    Fax: 919-684-8866
    Email: jonathan.davidson@duke.edu

    For more information and to preview this tool:
    Institution: International Clinical Psychopharmacology
    Web: http://www.hamiltonfht.ca/docs/public/short-ptsd-rating-interview---sprint.pdf
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8179. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  7. Add Health: National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
    Source: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development [National Institutes of Health] (NICHD)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II of this study focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III data collection included in-home interviews with original respondents and their partners. During Wave IV, a comprehensive personal interview was administered with original Wave 1 respondents that included physical measurements and biospecimen collection. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Administered by: Self Report/Self Administered, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Resnick MD, Bearman PS, Blum RW, Bauman KE, Harris KM, Jones J, Tabor J, Beuhring T, Sieving RE, Shew M, Ireland M, Bearinger LH, Udry JR. Protecting adolescents from harm. Findings from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health. JAMA. 1997 Sep 10;278(10):823-32. PubMed PMID: 9293990. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9293990. Subscription required.

    Swallen KC, Reither EN, Haas SA, Meier AM. Overweight, obesity, and health-related quality of life among adolescents: the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Pediatrics. 2005 Feb;115(2):340-7. PubMed PMID: 15687442. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15687442. Subscription required.

    Cubbin C, Santelli J, Brindis CD, Braveman P. Neighborhood context and sexual behaviors among adolescents: findings from the national longitudinal study of adolescent health. Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2005 Sep;37(3):125-34. PubMed PMID: 16150660. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16150660. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Address: CB# 8120, University Square
    123 West Franklin Street, Room 304-C
    Chapel Hill, NC 27516-2524
    Email: addhealth@unc.edu
    Web: http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth/contact

    For more information:
    Institution: Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan
    http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/21600
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8340. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  8. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)
    Source: University of North Carolina, Gillings School of Global Public Health
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), is a prospective epidemiologic study conducted in four U.S. communities. ARIC is designed to investigate the causes of atherosclerosis and its clinical outcomes, and variation in cardiovascular risk factors, medical care, and disease by race, gender, location, and date. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Adults Only
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):

    The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study: design and objectives. The ARIC investigators. Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Apr;129(4):687-702. PubMed PMID: 2646917. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2646917. Subscription required.

    Sharrett AR. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Introduction and objectives of the hemostasis component. Ann Epidemiol. 1992 Jul;2(4):467-9. PubMed PMID: 1342297. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1342297. Subscription required.

    White AD, Folsom AR, Chambless LE, Sharret AR, Yang K, Conwill D, Higgins M, Williams OD, Tyroler HA. Community surveillance of coronary heart disease in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study: methods and initial two years experience. J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;49(2):223-33. PubMed PMID: 8606324. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8606324. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: David Couper, PhD, Principal Investigator
    Institution: University of North Carolina
    Phone: 919-962-3229
    Email: david_couper@unc.edu

    Contact person: Kim Ring, Project Director
    Institution: University of North Carolina
    Phone: 919-962-3096
    Email: kim_ring@unc.edu

    For more information:
    Institution: National Health, Lung, and Blood Institute
    Web: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/resources/obesity/pop-studies/aric.htm

    To preview this tool:
    Institution: University of North Carolina, Gillings School of Public Health
    http://www2.cscc.unc.edu/aric/cohort-forms
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8341. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  9. Agricultural Health Study (AHS)
    Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a prospective study of cancer and other health outcomes in a cohort of licensed pesticide applicators and their spouses from Iowa and North Carolina. The AHS began in 1993 with the goal of answering important questions about factors that affect the health of farming populations. The goals are to investigate the effects of environmental, occupational, dietary, and genetic factors on the health of the agricultural population. The AHS is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, (specifically, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences); Environmental Protection Agency; and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Questionnaires on specific body systems (lung health) and specific disasters (flooding) have not yet been made available on the study Web site. Contact principal investigator to inquire about these materials.

    Population: High Risk/Special/Unique Population
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Specific Body Systems; Occupational Health
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Alavanja MC, Sandler DP, McMaster SB, Zahm SH, McDonnell CJ, Lynch CF, Pennybacker M, Rothman N, Dosemeci M, Bond AE, Blair A. The Agricultural Health Study. Environ Health Perspect. 1996 Apr;104(4):362-9. PubMed PMID: 8732939; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1469343. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8732939. Subscription not required.

    Engel LS, Satagopan J, Sima CS, Orlow I, Mujumdar U, Coble J, Roy P, Yoo S, Sandler DP, Alavanja MC. Sun exposure, vitamin D receptor genetic variants, and risk of breast cancer in the Agricultural Health Study. Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Feb;122(2):165-71. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1206274. Epub 2013 Nov 18. PubMed PMID: 24252436; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3915256. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24252436. Subscription not required.

    Kamel F, Goldman SM, Umbach DM, Chen H, Richardson G, Barber MR, Meng C, Marras C, Korell M, Kasten M, Hoppin JA, Comyns K, Chade A, Blair A, Bhudhikanok GS, Webster Ross G, William Langston J, Sandler DP, Tanner CM. Dietary fat intake, pesticide use, and Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2014 Jan;20(1):82-7. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2013.09.023. Epub 2013 Oct 1. PubMed PMID: 24120951; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3936597. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24120951. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Dale P. Sandler, PhD, Principal Investigator
    Institution: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
    Phone: 919-541-4668
    Fax: 919-541-2511
    Email: Sandler@niehs.nih

    For more information:
    Institution: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
    Web: https://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/epi/studies/ahs/

    Institution: Environmental Protection Agency
    Web: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/health/ag-health.html

    Institution: Iowa State University, Extension and Outreach
    Web: https://www.extension.iastate.edu/pme/AgHealth.html
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8342. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  10. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Questionnaire is a telephone survey that was developed and conducted to monitor state-level prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature morbidity and mortality. The basic philosophy was to collect data on actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge, that would be especially useful for planning, initiating, supporting, and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention programs. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Robbins CL, Zapata LB, Farr SL, Kroelinger CD, Morrow B, Ahluwalia I, D'Angelo DV, Barradas D, Cox S, Goodman D, Williams L, Grigorescu V, Barfield WD; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Core state preconception health indicators - pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system and behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 2009. MMWR Surveill Summ. 2014 Apr 25;63(3):1-62. PubMed PMID: 24759729. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24759729. Subscription not required.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Self-reported increased confusion or memory loss and associated functional difficulties among adults aged ≥ 60 years - 21 States, 2011. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2013 May 10;62(18):347-50. PubMed PMID: 23657108. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23657108. Subscription not required.

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Behavioral risk factor survey of Vietnamese--California, 1991. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1992 Feb 7;41(5):69-72. PubMed PMID: 1732712. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1732712. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Address: 1600 Clifton Rd., Mailstop E-97
    Atlanta, GA 30333
    Phone: 800-CDC-INFO/800-232-4636/TTY: 888-232-6348
    Web: https://www.cdc.gov/brfss/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8343. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  11. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The survey is unique in that it combines interviews and physical examinations. NHANES is a major program of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The NHANES interview includes demographic, socioeconomic, dietary, and health-related questions. The examination component consists of medical, dental, and physiological measurements, as well as laboratory tests administered by highly trained medical personnel. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Calafat AM, Wong LY, Kuklenyik Z, Reidy JA, Needham LL. Polyfluoroalkylchemicals in the U.S. population: data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2004 and comparisons with NHANES 1999-2000. Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Nov;115(11):1596-602. PubMed PMID: 18007991; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2072821. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18007991. Subscription not required.

    Cutler JA, Sorlie PD, Wolz M, Thom T, Fields LE, Roccella EJ. Trends in hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control rates in United States adults between 1988-1994 and 1999-2004. Hypertension. 2008 Nov;52(5):818-27. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.108.113357. Epub 2008 Oct 13. PubMed PMID: 18852389. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18852389. Subscription not required.

    Hoppin JA, Jaramillo R, Salo P, Sandler DP, London SJ, Zeldin DC. Questionnaire predictors of atopy in a US population sample: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2006. Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Mar 1;173(5):544-52. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwq392. Epub 2011 Jan 27. PubMed PMID: 21273397; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3105435. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21273397. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: National Center for Health Statistics
    Address: 3311 Toledo Rd., Room 5419
    Hyattsville, MD 20782
    Phone: 1-800-232-4636

    For more information:
    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Web: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8344. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  12. Environmental Polymorphisms Registry (EPR)
    Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences [National Institutes of Health] (NIEHS)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Environmental Polymorphisms Registry (EPR) is a long-term research project to collect and store DNA from up to 20,000 North Carolinians in a biobank. The DNA samples are available to scientists to study variations in genes (known as polymorphisms) that might be linked to common diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, asthma, and others. While many types of genes are studied as part of the EPR, the focus is on a category known as "environmental response genes." This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Adults Only
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Spivey A. Environmental polymorphism registry. Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jul;114(7):A408-9. PubMed PMID: 16865819; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1513308. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16865819. Subscription not required.

    Chulada PC, Vahdat HL, Sharp RR, DeLozier TC, Watkins PB, Pusek SN, Blackshear PJ. The Environmental Polymorphisms Registry: a DNA resource to study genetic susceptibility loci. Hum Genet. 2008 Mar;123(2):207-14. doi: 10.1007/s00439-007-0457-5. Epub 2008 Jan 10. PubMed PMID: 18193459. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18193459. Subscription required.

    Chulada PC, Vainorius E, Garantziotis S, Burch LH, Blackshear PJ, Zeldin DC. The Environmental Polymorphism Registry: a unique resource that facilitates translational research of environmental disease. Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Nov;119(11):1523-7. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1003348. Epub 2011 Jun 9. PubMed PMID: 21659040; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3226495. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21659040. Subscription not required.

    Available Formats: MS Word Document, PDF, Booklet

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Shepherd H. Schurman, M.D., Acting Medical Director, Clinical Research Unit, Principal Investigator, EPR
    Institution: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
    Phone: 919-541-7736
    Fax: 919-541-4133
    Email: schurmansh@niehs.nih.gov

    Contact person: Beverly A. Warden, Ph.D., MPH, Project Director, EPR
    Institution: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
    Phone: 919-313-7558
    Fax: 919-544-7507
    Email: wardenba@niehs.nih.gov

    Contact person: Nicole Edwards, Study Coordinator, Clinical Research Unit (CRU)
    Institution: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
    Phone: 919-316-4976
    Email: nicole.edwards@nih.gov

    Contact person: Stavros Garantziotis, M.D., Acting Director, Clinical Research Program, CRU Medical Director
    Institution: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
    Phone: 919-541-9859
    Fax: 919-541-4133
    Email: garantziotis@niehs.nih.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8345. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  13. Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)
    Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) is a multi-center epidemiologic study of Hispanic/Latino populations to determine the role of acculturation in the prevalence and development of disease, and to identify risk factors playing a protective or harmful role in Hispanics/Latinos. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Ethnic/Religious Minorities
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Sorlie PD, Aviles-Santa LM, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Kaplan RC, Daviglus ML, Giachello AL, Schneiderman N, Raij L, Talavera G, Allison M, Lavange L, Chambless LE, Heiss G. Design and implementation of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Ann Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;20(8):629-41. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.03.015. PubMed PMID: 20609343; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2904957. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20609343. Subscription not required.

    Daviglus ML, Talavera GA, Aviles-Santa ML, Allison M, Cai J, Criqui MH, Gellman M, Giachello AL, Gouskova N, Kaplan RC, LaVange L, Penedo F, Perreira K, Pirzada A, Schneiderman N, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Sorlie PD, Stamler J. Prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular diseases among Hispanic/Latino individuals of diverse backgrounds in the United States. JAMA. 2012 Nov 7;308(17):1775-84. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.14517. PubMed PMID: 23117778; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3777250. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23117778. Subscription not required.

    Denes P, Garside DB, Lloyd-Jones D, Gouskova N, Soliman EZ, Ostfeld R, Zhang ZM, Camacho A, Prineas R, Raij L, Daviglus ML. Major and minor electrocardiographic abnormalities and their association with underlying cardiovascular disease and risk factors in Hispanics/Latinos (from the Hispanic
    Community Health Study/Study of Latinos). Am J Cardiol. 2013 Nov 15;112(10):1667-75. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.08.004. Epub 2013 Sep 19. PubMed PMID: 24055066; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3864828. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24055066. Subscription required.

    Gallo LC, Penedo FJ, Carnethon M, Isasi CR, Sotres-Alvarez D, Malcarne VL, Roesch SC, Youngblood ME, Daviglus ML, Gonzalez P, Talavera GT. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study: sample, design, and procedures. Ethn Dis. 2014 Winter;24(1):77-83. PubMed PMID: 24620452; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3986116. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24620452. Subscription required.
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8346. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  14. Sister Study
    Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences [National Institutes of Health] (NIEHS)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Sister Study is prospectively examining environmental and familial risk factors for breast cancer and other diseases in a cohort of 50,000 sisters of women who have had breast cancer. Such sisters have about twice the risk of developing breast cancer as other women. The frequency of relevant genes and shared risk factors will be greater among sisters, increasing the statistical power of the study to detect risks. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: High Risk/Special/Unique Populations
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Permission/Request required

    Citation(s):
    Spector D, Deroo LA, Sandler DP. Lifestyle behaviors in black and white women with a family history of breast cancer. Prev Med. 2011 May;52(5):394-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.03.001. Epub 2011 Mar 17. PubMed PMID: 21396953; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3096469. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21396953. Subscription not required.

    Lin CJ, DeRoo LA, Jacobs SR, Sandler DP. Accuracy and reliability of self-reported weight and height in the Sister Study. Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jun;15(6):989-99. doi: 10.1017/S1368980011003193. Epub 2011 Dec 9. PubMed PMID: 22152926; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3511620. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22152926. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, The Sister Study
    Phone: 877-4SISTER (877-474-7837); for deaf or hard of hearing, 866-TTY-4SIS (866-889-4747)
    Email: update@sisterstudy.org
    Web: https://www.sisterstudystars.org/Default.aspx?projectid=50548533-6eba-4470-83c8-d9019d3a14ad
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8347. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  15. Reproductive Health Assessment (RHA) Toolkit for Conflict-Affected Women
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Reproductive Health Assessment (RHA) Toolkit for Conflict-Affected Women provides user-friendly tools to quantitatively assess the reproductive health needs of conflict-affected women aged 15 to 49 years. The RHA Toolkit enables field staff to collect data to inform program planning, monitoring, evaluation, and advocacy. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for questionnaire materials for developing post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: High Risk/Special/Unique Populations
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Collins JL, Lehnherr J, Posner SF, Toomey KE. Ties that bind: maternal and child health and chronic disease prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prev Chronic Dis. 2009 Jan;6(1):A01. Epub 2008 Dec 15. PubMed PMID: 19080007; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2644605. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19080007. Subscription not required.

    Anwar J, Mpofu E, Matthews LR, Shadoul AF, Brock KE. Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience. BMC Public Health. 2011 Jun 30;11:523. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-523. PubMed PMID: 21718519; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3146866. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21718519. Subscription not required.

    McGinn T, Austin J, Anfinson K, Amsalu R, Casey SE, Fadulalmula SI, Langston A, Lee-Jones L, Meyers J, Mubiru FK, Schlecht J, Sharer M, Yetter M. Family planning in conflict: results of cross-sectional baseline surveys in three African countries. Confl Health. 2011 Jul 13;5:11. doi: 10.1186/1752-1505-5-11. PubMed PMID: 21752241; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3162885. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21752241. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Address: 1600 Clifton RD.
    Atlanta, GA 30333
    Phone: 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636); TTY: (888) 232-6348
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8348. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  16. Reproductive Health Assessment After Disasters (RHAD): A Toolkit for U.S. Health Departments
    Source: University of North Carolina, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Center for Public Health Preparedness (UNCCPHP)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: This resource was created to assist with assessing the reproductive health needs of women aged 15-44 affected by natural and man-made disasters. Questionnaire topics include safe motherhood, infant care, family planning, family stressors and service needs, health and risk behaviors, and gender-based violence. The data gathered will promote and enhance evidence-based local programs and services to improve the reproductive health of women and their families. The toolkit was published 4/8/2011 by the University of North Carolina, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Center for Public Health Preparedness (UNCCPHP). This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: High Risk/Special/Unique Populations
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Body Systems
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Zotti ME, Williams AM. Reproductive Health Assessment After Disaster: introduction to the RHAD toolkit. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2011 Aug;20(8):1123-7. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2011.3021. Epub 2011 Jun 20. Review. PubMed PMID: 21688999. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21688999. Subscription required.

    Available Format: MS Word Document

    Contact information:

    Contact Person: Rachel Wilfert
    Institution: University of North Carolina
    Phone: 919-966-4085
    Email: rachel.wilfert@unc.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8349. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  17. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) Toolkit: Second Edition
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)
    Format: PDF (3.74 MB)
    Annotation: The National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Health Studies Branch (DEHHE/HSB) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) toolkit to assist personnel from any local, state, regional, or federal public health departments in conducting the CASPER during a disaster. The second edition was published 7/9/2012. One of the main objectives in developing this toolkit is to standardize the assessment procedures focusing on U.S. disaster response. The CASPER toolkit provides guidelines on data collection tool development, methodology, sample selection, training, data collection, analysis, and report writing. During a disaster, public health and emergency management professionals must be prepared to respond to and meet the needs of the affected public in a timely manner. HSB's rapid needs assessment toolkit can be used by public health practitioners and emergency management officials to determine the health status and basic needs of the affected community in a quick and low-cost manner. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Administered by: Trained Lay Interviewer/Interviewer Administered
    Language(s): English
    Special Considerations: Interview/Questionnaire was conducted at participant's home.
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Preparedness; Specific Disasters
    Authors: Bayleyegn, Tesfaye; Vagi, Sara; Schnall, Amy
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Choudhary E, Chen T, Martin C, Vagi S, Roth J Jr, Keim M, Noe R, Ponausuia SE, Lemusu S, Bayleyegn T, Wolkin A. Public health needs assessments of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, after the 2009 tsunami. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2012 Oct;6(3):209-216. Epub 2013 Apr 8. PubMed PMID: 23077263. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23077263. Subscription required.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Assessment of household preparedness through training exercises--two metropolitan counties, Tennessee, 2011. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2012 Sep 14;61(36):720-2. PubMed PMID: 22971744. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22971744. Subscription not required.

    Murti M, Bayleyegn T, Stanbury M, Flanders WD, Yard E, Nyaku M, Wolkin A. Household emergency preparedness by housing type from a community assessment for public health emergency response (CASPER), Michigan. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2014 Feb;8(1):12-9. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2013.111. Epub 2014 Feb 13. PubMed PMID: 24524350. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24524350. Subscription required.

    Nyaku MK, Wolkin AF, McFadden J, Collins J, Murti M, Schnall A, Bies S, Stanbury M, Beggs J, Bayleyegn TM. Assessing radiation emergency preparedness planning by using Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) methodology. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014;29(3):1-9. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X14000491. Epub 2014 Jun 6. PubMed PMID: 24906059. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24906059. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Health Studies Branch
    Address: 4770 Buford Highway, MS F-57
    Chamblee, GA 30341
    Phone: 770-488-3410
    Fax: 770-488-3450
    Web: https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/hsb/
    For additional information on the CASPER program: https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/hsb/disaster/casper.htm
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8351. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  18. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian non-institutionalized population of the United States and is one of the major data collection programs of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Since 1957, the content of the survey has been updated about every 10 to 15 years. A substantially revised NHIS questionnaire was implemented in 1997 and has improved the ability of the NHIS to provide important health information. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Pleis JR, Ward BW, Lucas JW. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2009. Vital Health Stat 10. 2010 Dec;(249):1-207. PubMed PMID: 21905346. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21905346. Subscription required.

    Pleis JR, Lucas JW, Ward BW. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2008. Vital Health Stat 10. 2009 Dec;(242):1-157. PubMed PMID: 20821903. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20821903. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Division of Health Interview Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics
    Address: 3311 Toledo RD., Room 2217
    Hyattsville, MD 20782
    Phone: 301-458-4901/301-458-4001
    Fax: 301-458-4035
    Email: nhislist@cdc.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8352. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  19. North West Public Health Observatory Health, Lifestyle and Well-Being Toolkit (Public Health England)
    Source: United Kingdom Department of Health (DH)
    Format: PDF
    Annotation: The North West Public Health Observatory Health, Lifestyle and Well-Being Toolkit (Public Health England) provides a collection of questions for lifestyle health surveys that may be suitable for a wide range of users. The areas of alcohol, smoking, food and diet, physical activity, and general health and wellbeing are covered, and questions are taken from a wide range of relevant sources. Sources include the General Lifestyle survey, the Health Survey for England, the Scottish Health Survey, the Welsh Health Survey, and the Northern Ireland Health and Social Wellbeing Survey. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Bellis MA, Hughes K, Tocque K, Hennell T, Humphrey G, Wyke S. Assessing and communicating the health and judicial impact of alcohol use. Public Health. 2005 Apr;119(4):253-61. PubMed PMID: 15733684. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15733684. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: North West Public Health Observatory, Centre for Public Health, John Moores University
    Address: Kingsway House, Hatton Garden
    Liverpool L3 2AJ
    Phone: +44 (151) 904 6043
    Fax: +44 (151) 231 8020
    Email: nwpho-contact@ljmu.ac.uk

    Institution: Public Health England
    Address: John Moores University, Henry Cotton Campus
    15-21 Webster Street
    Room 209, 2nd Floor
    Liverpool L3 2ET
    Phone: +44(0)151 231 4535
    Fax: +44(0)151 231 4552
    Email: KITNorthWest@phe.gov.uk
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8353. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  20. Disaster Psychosocial Assessment and Surveillance Toolkit (Disaster-PAST)
    Source: Louisiana State University (LSU)
    Format: Text
    Annotation: The Disaster Psychosocial Assessment and Surveillance Toolkit (Disaster-PAST) is from the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans (LSU HSC) and was designed for surveillance of community mental health and psychosocial functioning following disasters, for the purpose of informing distribution of services by public or private entities and better understanding the ongoing need in recovering communities. It includes a section on applying for Institutional Review Board (IRB) clearance for disaster-related human research. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English and Spanish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Ciccone, A., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Louisiana. State Department of Health, and Hospitals. Office of Behavioral Health. Disaster Psychosocial Assessment and Surveillance Toolkit (Disaster-Past): Methods to Enhance Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery. Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Department of Psychiatry, 2012.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Department of Psychiatry
    Address: 1542 Tulane Avenue
    New Orleans, Louisiana 70112
    Phone: 504-568-6004
    Fax: 504-568-6006
    Web: http://www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu/psychiatry

    Institution: Louisiana State Department of Health and Hospitals, Office of Behavioral Health
    Address: 628 North Fourth Street
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70802
    Phone: 225-342-9500
    Web: http://new.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/page/202
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8354. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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