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The Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health.

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Database of biomedical journal citations and abstracts.

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Health information resources for the general public.

Displaying records 21 - 40 of 287

of 15
  1. Victorian Disaster Mental Health Workforce Capacity Survey
    Source: University of Melbourne
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 10/2012
    Annotation: The Victorian Disaster Mental Health Workforce Capacity Survey sought to examine the current state (i.e., the nature, scope, profile, and capacity) of the disaster mental health workforce in Victoria. See Appendix A: Survey Template of this document. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 8.4
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 19 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Occupational Health; Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Reifels L, Naccarella L, Blashki G, Pirkis J. Examining disaster mental health workforce capacity. Psychiatry. 2014 Summer;77(2):199-205. doi: 10.1521/psyc.2014.77.2.199. Epub 2014 May 29. PubMed PMID: 24865201. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24865201. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: University of Melbourne
    Address: University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010
    Phone: 13 MELB (13 6352)
    International Phone: +(61 3) 9035 5511
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12935. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  2. NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Common Data Elements
    Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, CounterAct [Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats] Program (NINDS)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 8/2012
    Annotation: This resource is a project to standardize the collection of investigational data in order to facilitate comparison of results across studies and more effectively aggregate information into significant metadata results. It outlines data standards and provides accompanying tools to help investigators and research teams collect and record standardized clinical data. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8091. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  3. Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS)
    Source: Harvard University, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2/2012
    Annotation: The Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS) is a widely used measure of daily perceived discrimination. It is one of the most widely used discrimination scales in epidemiologic and public health research. This resource was identified by the ://dr2.nlm.nih.gov/" target="_blank">NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Moderate
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 10.2
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 10 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Betancourt TS, McBain RK, Newnham EA, Brennan RT. The intergenerational impact of war: longitudinal relationships between caregiver and child mental health in post conflict Sierra Leone. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;56(10):1101-7. doi: 10.1111/jcpp.12389. Epub 2015 Feb 11. PubMed PMID: 25665018. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25665018. Subscription required.

    Krieger N, Smith K, Naishadham D, Hartman C, Barbeau EM. Experiences of discrimination: validity and reliability of a self-report measure for population health research on racism and health. Soc Sci Med. 2005 Oct; 61(7):1576-1596. Epub 2005 Apr 21. PubMed PMID: 16005789. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16005789. Subscription required.

    Taylor TR, Kamarck TW, Shiffman S. Validation of the Detroit area study discrimination scale in a community sample of older African American adults: the Pittsburgh healthy heart project. Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(2):88-94. PubMed PMID: 15456677. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15456677. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: David Williams
    Institution: Harvard University, T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    Address: 677 Huntington Ave., Room 615, Boston, MA 02115
    Email: dwilliam@hsph.harvard.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12903. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  4. Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance: National Response Team Technical Assistance Document (TAD)
    Source: U.S. National Response Team (NRT)
    Format: PDF (4 MB)
    Date Published: 1/26/2012
    Annotation: This 220-page document provides a set of guidelines and recommendations that address all aspects of protecting emergency responders. It is intended to be of use to all those involved in the deployment and protection of emergency responders, including incident management leadership; leadership of response organizations; health, safety, and medical personnel; and the workers themselves. It is intended to address all aspects of protecting emergency responders and should be applicable over the full range of emergency types and settings. It is the companion document to "Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance: A Guide for Key Decision Makers." The tools section begins on page 68 of the Technical Assistance Document. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Occupational Health
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8247. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  5. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) General Preparedness Module
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 1/2012
    Annotation: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed a standardized general household preparedness module for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 2006, and Montana administered the 11-question module in 2012. The purpose of this resource is to examine the association between emergency preparedness, demographic characteristics, and health status to help public health officials develop strategies to improve outreach and training. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.9
    Population: Adults Only
    Length: 11 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report, Lay Interviewer
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Preparedness; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Citation(s):

    Der-Martirosian C, Strine T, Atia M, Chu K, Mitchell MN, Dobalian A. General household emergency preparedness: a comparison between veterans and nonveterans. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Apr;29(2):134-40. doi: 10.1017/s1049023x1400020x. Epub 2014 Mar 20. PubMed PMID: 24642181. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24642181. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Emily Ehrlich Healy
    BRFSS Coordinator/Epidemiologist
    Institution: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services
    Phone: 406-444-2973
    Email: ehealy@mt.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12967. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. Combat Exposure Scale (CES)
    Source: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2012
    Annotation: The Combat Exposure Scale (CES) is a seven-item self-report measure that assesses wartime stressors experienced by combatants. Respondents are asked to respond based on their exposure to various combat situations, such as firing rounds at the enemy and being on dangerous duty. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.5
    Population: Military
    Length: 7 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Keane TM, Fairbank JA, Caddell JM, Zimering RT, Taylor KL, Mora CA. Clinical evaluation of a measure to assess combat exposure. Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1989 Mar;1(1):53.

    Stocker RP, Cieply MA, Paul B, Khan H, Henry L, Kontos AP, Germain A. Combat-related blast exposure and traumatic brain injury influence brain glucose metabolism during REM sleep in military veterans. Neuroimage. 2014 Oct 1;99:207-14. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.05.067. Epub 2014 Jun 4. PubMed PMID: 24893322; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4112017. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24893322. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: National Center for PTSD
    Web: http://www.ptsd.va.gov/
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12886. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  7. Network of Relationships Inventory (NRI)
    Source: University of Denver (DU)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 2012
    Annotation: The Network of Relationships Inventory (NRI) is able to examine a broad array of relationship characteristics across a number of different types of personal relationships. The most important feature of the NRI is that participants use the same set of items to describe their relationship with each of several members of their social network (e.g., mother, father, sibling, friend, romantic partner, and teacher). This feature results in a matrix of scores that are useful both for describing mean-level differences among different types of relationships and for describing each type of relationship in terms of a profile of qualities. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Population: Adults only
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Jia X, Ying L, Zhou X, Wu X, Lin C. The effects of extraversion, social support on the posttraumatic stress disorder and posttraumatic growth of adolescent survivors of the Wenchuan earthquake. PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e0121480. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0121480. Epub 2015 Mar 31. PubMed PMID: 25815720; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4376870. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25815720. Subscription not required.
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 13486. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  8. 2011 Bastrop County CASPER (Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response) Questionnaire
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 9/23/2011
    Annotation: This survey instrument used in the 2011 Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) in Bastrop, Texas, consisted of questions addressing several areas of concern for local emergency management and public health officials involved in the disaster response and recovery efforts for a wildfire. A similar instrument, http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/suppl/10.1089/hs.2015.0060/suppl_file/Supp_App2.pdf, was also later administered in 2015 in Bastrop, Texas. Subject areas included structural damage to the residence, access to basic services such as utilities, access to medical care, physical and mental health status, evacuation behaviors, wildfire-related communications, and pet and livestock issues, preparedness, and recovery. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 5.7
    Population: Residential/Workplace
    Length: 34 questions
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Preparedness
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Kirsch KR, Feldt BA, Zane DF, Haywood T, Jones RW, Horney JA. Longitudinal Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response to Wildfire, Bastrop County, Texas. Health Secur. 2016 Mar-Apr; PubMed PMID: 27081889. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27081889. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Jennifer Horney, PhD
    Institution: Texas A&M University, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Address: 1266 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843
    Email: horney@sph.tamhsc.edu
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12944. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  9. GuLF STUDY: Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study
    Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
    Format: PDF (1 MB)
    Date Published: 9/7/2011
    Annotation: This 184-page report describes the Gulf Long-Term Follow-up (GuLF) Study in detail, including its short- and long-term objectives, design, statistical analysis methods and appendices A-V. The document is also known as the GuLF STUDY Protocol. Companion study materials are available at: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/epi/studies/gulfstudy/publications/index.cfm. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Authors: Sandler, Dale P.; Kwok, Richard K. ; Engel, Lawrence S.
    Type: Report
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 5300. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  10. Interview for Children: Traumatic Events Screening Inventory (TESI-C)
    Source: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD [Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder]
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 6/16/2011
    Annotation: The Traumatic Events Screening Inventory (TESI-C) protocol is a guide for clinical and/or research interviewing to screen for a child's history of exposure to potentially traumatic experiences. The protocol is designed to help clinicians focus in a systematic fashion on the primary domains of trauma for children, which include direct exposure to or witnessing of severe accidents, illness, or disaster; family or community conflict or violence; and sexual molestation. The questions are arranged to hierarchically review experiences in an order that helps the child tolerate the possible stress of disclosing traumatic experiences: gradually increasing the intimacy of the experiences (i.e., sexual trauma is reserved for the end of the interview), to help the child recall not only physical harm/violence but also incidents of threatened harm and witnessed trauma. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.2
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Fujiwara T, Yagi J, Homma H, Mashiko H, Nagao K, Okuyama M. Clinically significant behavior problems among young children 2 years after the Great East Japan Earthquake. PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e109342. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0109342. Epub 2014 Oct 22. PubMed PMID: 25333762; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4204852. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25333762. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD
    Phone: 802-296-6300
    Email: ncptsd@va.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12896. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  11. Assessment Center
    Source: Northwestern University
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 6/2011
    Annotation: Assessment Center is a free, online data collection tool that enables researchers to create study-specific Web sites for capturing participant data securely online. Studies can include measures within the Assessment Center library as well as custom instruments entered by the researcher. The instrument library includes self- and proxy-report short forms, computerized adaptive tests (CATs), and batteries or profiles from Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), Quality of Life in Neurological Diseases (Neuro-QoL), NIH Toolbox, and Health LiTT.

    Among other features, Assessment Center also enables downloading library instruments for administration on paper; customization of items or instruments (e.g., format, randomization, skip patterns); real-time scoring of CATs and short forms; storage of protected health information (PHI) in a separate, secure database; automated accrual reports; real-time data export; and ability to capture endorsement of online consent forms. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.
    [less]
    Type: Database/Dataset
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11237. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  12. Changes in Outlook Questionnaire (CiOQ)
    Source: National Institutes of Health, Disaster Research Response Program (DR2)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2011
    Annotation: The Changes in Outlook Questionnaire (CiOQ) is a retrospective self-report measurement tool that assesses positive and negative change following trauma. This self-report questionnaire asks participants to rate the extent to which they have experienced both positive and negative changes as a result of experiencing a highly stressful event. See pages 134-135 of this report for the specific tool. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 6.8
    Population: Adults only
    Length: 26 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Chinese
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Joseph S, Williams R, Yule W. Changes in outlook following disaster: The preliminary development of a measure to assess positive and negative responses. Journal of Traumatic Stress. 1993 Apr 1;6(2):271-9.

    Tang B, Kang P, Liu X, Liu Y, Liu Z, Wang B, Lv Y, Zhang L. Post-traumatic psychological changes among survivors of the Lushan earthquake living in the most affected areas. Psychiatry Res. 2014 Dec 15;220(1-2):384-90. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.050. Epub 2014 Aug 17. PubMed PMID: 25128250. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25128250. Subscription required.

    Zang Y, Hunt N, Cox T. Adapting narrative exposure therapy for Chinese earthquake survivors: a pilot randomised controlled feasibility study. BMC Psychiatry. 2014;14:262. doi: 10.1186/s12888-014-0262-3. Epub 2014 Jan 1. PubMed PMID: 25927297; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4189751. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25927297. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Stephen Joseph
    Institution: Centre for Trauma, Resilience, and Growth, School of Sociology and Policy
    Address: University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
    Email: stephen.joseph@nottingham.ac.uk
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12958. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  13. Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): The CART Integrated System
    Source: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
    Format: PDF (3.3 MB)
    Date Published: 2011
    Annotation: This 96-page resource provides information about the Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART), designed to enhance community resilience through assessment, group processes, planning, and action. CART tools can assist community organizations in systematically assessing their communities for disaster prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery, and in collecting and using assessment data to develop and implement strategies for building community resilience. This resource was created jointly by the Terrorism and Disaster Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Survey instruments are located in Appendix A. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Social Support and Resiliency
    Authors: Pfefferbaum, Betty; Pfefferbaum, R.L.; Van Horn, R.L.
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 7468. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  14. PILOT Study: Dampness and Mold Assessment Tool Instructions Packet
    Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2011
    Annotation: This observational assessment tool was developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to gauge signs of dampness, water damage, mold growth, and musty odors in rooms and areas throughout a building. The information collected aims to provide valuable data for motivating remediation, prioritizing intervention, and evaluating remediation effectiveness. This packet describes step-by-step instructions to identify and record areas of dampness or mold, trigger early repair, create awareness of potential problem areas, and track or monitor past and present areas of focus. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 3.6
    Population: Residential/Workplace, All/Anyone
    Length:
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Specific Disasters; Environmental Exposure(s)
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citations:
    Park JH, Schleiff PL, Attfield MD, Cox Ganser JM, Kreiss K. Building-related respiratory symptoms can be predicted with semi-quantitative indices of exposure to dampness and mold. Indoor Air. 2004; 14:425 - 433. PubMed PMID: 15500636. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15500636. Subscription required.

    Cox-Ganser JM, Rao CY, Park JH, Schumpert JC, Kreiss K. Asthma and respiratory symptoms in hospital workers related to dampness and biological contaminants. Indoor Air. 2009; 19(4):280-290. PubMed PMID: 19500175. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19500175. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Contact person: Michelle Martin
    Institution: NIOSH
    Phone: 304-285-5734

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Email: moldsheet#1@cdc.gov
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 11427. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  15. Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II (AAQ-II)
    Source: Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 2011
    Annotation: The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II (AAQ-II) was developed to establish an internally consistent measure of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)'s model of mental health and behavioral effectiveness. When ACT was originally developed, the overarching term for its underlying model was experiential avoidance: the attempt to alter the form, frequency, or situational sensitivity of negative private events (e.g., thoughts, feelings, and physiological sensations), even when doing so leads to behavioral difficulties. Acceptance was the term used to positively describe this model; it is defined as the willingness to experience (i.e., not alter the form, frequency, or sensitivity of) unwanted private events, in the pursuit of one's values and goals. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 3.3
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 7 questions
    Administered by: Self Administered/Self Report
    Language(s): English, Arabic, Chinese, Danish, Dutch, Farsi, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Miron LR, Orcutt HK, Kumpula MJ. Differential predictors of transient stress versus post-traumatic stress disorder: evaluating risk following targeted mass violence. Behav Ther. 2014 Nov;45(6):791-805. doi: 10.1016/j.beth.2014.07.005. Epub 2014 Oct 15. PubMed PMID: 25311288; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4218730. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25311288. Subscription not required.

    Orcutt HK, Bonanno GA, Hannan SM, Miron LR. Prospective trajectories of post-traumatic stress in college women following a campus mass shooting. J Trauma Stress. 2014 Jun;27(3):249-56. doi: 10.1002/jts.21914. Epub 2014 May 14. PubMed PMID: 24819209; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4218731. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24819209. Subscription not required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Association for Contextual Behavioral Science
    Web: https://contextualscience.org/contact
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12930. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  16. Child Psychosocial Distress Screener (CPDS)
    Source: Children and War Foundation
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 5/2010
    Annotation: The Child Psychosocial Distress Screener (CPDS) is a multi-source instrument that assesses non-specific child psychosocial distress and the likelihood of need for psychosocial treatment. The instrument is developed as a primary screener in conflict-affected community settings (especially low- and middle-income settings), for children between 8 and 14 years old. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 7.8
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 7 questions
    Administered by: Trained Lay Examiner/Interviewer Administration, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Yim ES, Macy RD, Ciottone G. Medical and psychosocial needs of Olympic and Pan American athletes after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti: an opportunity to promote resilience through sports medicine and public diplomacy. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Apr;29(2):195-9. doi: 10.1017/s1049023x14000302. Epub 2014 Apr 12. PubMed PMID: 24721144. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24721144. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Children and War Foundation
    Address: Kluge Law Firm, Postboks 394 Sentrum, N-5805 Bergen, Norway
    Email: contact@childrenandwar.org
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 13472. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  17. Census Questions on Disability Endorsed by the Washington Group
    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Format: PDF
    Date Published: 3/2010
    Annotation: The Washington Group has developed this short set of questions for use on national censuses for gathering information about limitations in basic activity functioning among national populations. The questions were designed to provide comparable data cross-nationally for populations living in a great variety of cultures with varying economic resources. The objective was to identify persons with similar types and levels of limitations in basic activity functioning, regardless of nationality or culture. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Easy
    Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level: 10.3
    Population: All/Anyone
    Length: 6 questions
    Administered by: Lay Interviewer
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Free/Publicly Available

    Citation(s):
    Danquah L, Polack S, Brus A, Mactaggart I, Houdon CP, Senia P, Gallien P, Kuper H. Disability in post-earthquake Haiti: prevalence and inequality in access to services. Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(12):1082-9. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2014.956186. Epub 2014 Sep 3. PubMed PMID: 25178862. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25178862. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Phone: 800-CDC-INFO
    Web: https://wwwn.cdc.gov/dcs/ContactUs/Form
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12951. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  18. Beery VMI (Visual-Motor Integration): Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration, 6th Edition
    Source: National Institutes of Health, Disaster Research Response Program (DR2)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 2010
    Annotation: The Beery Visual-Motor Integration (VMI) measures the extent to which individuals can integrate their visual and motor abilities. It is commonly used to identify children who are having significant difficulty with visual-motor integration and to determine the most appropriate course of action. The Beery VMI is suitable for respondents with diverse environmental, educational, and linguistic backgrounds. Additionally, the test can be used as an outcome measure to assess the effectiveness of education and intervention programs. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 30 items
    Administered by: Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Proprietary-Cost/Purchase required. This tool is available only in Canada.

    Citation(s):
    Cao X, Laplante DP, Brunet A, Ciampi A, King S. Prenatal maternal stress affects motor function in 5(1/2)-year-old children: project ice storm. Dev Psychobiol. 2014 Jan;56(1):117-25. doi: 10.1002/dev.21085. Epub 2012 Nov 13. PubMed PMID: 23143986. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23143986. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: MHS Inc.
    Address: P.O. Box 950, North Tonawanda, NY, 14120-0950
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12908. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  19. PROMIS (Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System): Dynamic Tools to Measure Health Outcomes from the Patient Perspective
    Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 2010
    Annotation: This resource is a system of highly reliable, precise measures of patient-reported health status for physical, mental, and social well-being. PROMIS® tools measure what patients are able to do and how they feel by asking questions. PROMIS measures can be used as primary or secondary endpoints in clinical studies of the effectiveness of treatment, and PROMIS® tools can be used across a wide variety of chronic diseases and conditions and in the general population. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments. [less]
    Data Collection on: Lifestyle and Quality of Life; Mental Health and Cognitive Function; Social Support and Resiliency
    Type: Database/Dataset
    Access Notes: Selected PROMIS tools are also available in Spanish.
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 8090. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  20. Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF)
    Source: National Institutes of Health, Disaster Research Response Program (DR2)
    Format: Text
    Date Published: 12/2009
    Annotation: The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) is a questionnaire developed for parents and teachers of school-age children to assess executive function behaviors in the school and home environments. Designed to assess the abilities of a broad range of children and adolescents, the BRIEF is useful when working with children who have learning disabilities and attention disorders, traumatic brain injuries, lead exposure, pervasive developmental disorders, depression, and other developmental, neurological, psychiatric, and medical conditions. This resource was identified by the NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) for researchers looking for pre- and post-disaster data collection instruments.

    Ease of Use in Disaster Setting: Information Difficult
    Population: Children/Teens Only
    Length: 86 items
    Administered by: Parent/Teacher Administered, Specialist/Doctor/Expert
    Language(s): English
    [less]
    Data Collection on: Mental Health and Cognitive Function
    Type: Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes: Proprietary - Cost/Purchase required

    Citation(s):
    Yang R, Xiang YT, Shuai L, Qian Y, Lai KY, Ungvari GS, Chiu HF, Wang YF. Executive function in children and adolescents with post-traumatic stress disorder 4 and 12 months after the Sichuan earthquake in China. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;55(1):31-8. doi: 10.1111/jcpp.12089. Epub 2013 Jun 5. PubMed PMID: 23730971. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23730971. Subscription required.

    Contact information:

    Institution: PAR Customer Support
    Phone: 800-331-8378
    Includes Research Tools: Yes
    ID: 12910. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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